House of Spices (India) is recalling different lots of “MDH SAMBAR MASALA”, 3.5oz (100g) UPC code 6291103750327. This product is produced by R-PURE AGRO SPECIALITIES and distributed by HOUSE OF SPICES (INDIA). This product was tested by FDA through a certified laboratory to be positive for Salmonella.

The recalled MDH SAMBAR MASALA was distributed in northern California retail stores. The Lot Codes and Expiration dates are as follows:

LOT CODE EXPIRATION DATE
107 NOV 2021
48 DEC 2021
47 DEC 2021

 

The product comes in a 3.5 oz (100g), in a box with red and white MDH Logo. Below are pictures of the product.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered by the FDA that the Salmonella contaminated products were distributed.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella, a bacteria that is a common cause of food poisoning. Since the beginning of July 2019, at least four people became ill after consuming pork tamales or carnitas served from the deli section of the Sun View Produce establishment at 6110 W 63rd St, Chicago, IL 60638.

If you have pork tamales, carnitas or other hot foods purchased from the deli section of this establishment since July 1, 2019 in your freezer, do not eat—discard.

If you ate food purchased from the deli section since July 1, 2019, you may have been exposed to Salmonella. If you are experiencing severe diarrhea, symptoms of dehydration or high fever, seek medical attention.

As of August 5, 2019, implicated food items are no longer available at the store. There is no evidence that food made after this date was contaminated. CDPH performed an environmental assessment of the grocery store and provided guidance on safe food handling practices and environmental cleaning to prevent further spread of disease. CDPH has also issued an alert to area physicians about the outbreak, providing medical guidance.

Salmonella symptoms usually last four to seven days and most individuals recover without any treatment. Most people who are infected develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Although most infections resolve without antibiotics, older individuals or those with weakened immune systems may need medical evaluation and treatment.

Additional Resources

Nassau County Department of Health is investigating a cluster of cases of salmonellosis associated with people who consumed food or drink at the restaurant Brixx and Barley, located at 152 West Park Ave in Long Beach, NY. Potential exposures to Salmonella at the restaurant could date back to early July. Nassau County Department of Health has closed Brixx and Barley while the investigation as to the source of Salmonella is investigated.

Salmonella is typically transmitted during warmer months and is usually food borne. Most people who contract Salmonella will experience mild symptoms of gastrointestinal illness such as cramping and diarrhea, and symptoms usually start 12-72 hours after exposure. The majority of cases resolve on their own, without treatment, typically within 4-7 days. In some people, the symptoms can be more severe, requiring hospitalization. This is more likely to occur in infants, the elderly, and those immune suppressed.

Salmonella also can be spread from animal waste, and also from people to people. NCDOH recommends washing hands after contact with animals, washing hands often during preparation of food, and also washing your hands after using the toilet, changing diapers, or helping someone with diarrhea clean up after using the toilet.

If you have a Salmonella infection, or symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea, you should not prepare food or drinks for others until you no longer have diarrhea. Food handlers should avoid preparing food until their stool is clear of salmonella, which would be confirmed by the Department of Health.

Image (c) Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc.

CDC and FDA are now advising people not to buy or feed any pig ear dog treats to pets, including any that may already be in homes.

People can get sick after handling the treats or caring for dogs who ate the treats. Dogs might get sick after eating them.

Since the last update on July 17, 2019, a total of 34 ill people have been added to this investigation.

A total of 127 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from 33 states.

26 ill people (30%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

24 illnesses (21%) are among children younger than 5 years.

State health and regulatory officials in several states and the FDA have tested pig ear dog treats at various suppliers and identified many different strains of Salmonella. No single supplier, distributor or common brand of pig ear treats has been identified that could account for all the illnesses.

This is why CDC and FDA are now advising people to not buy or feed any pig ear dog treats to pets.

Background

On April 19, 2019, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) Public Health Laboratory (PHL) determined that two clinical Salmonella Braenderup isolates submitted through routine surveillance had indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns (Minnesota designation BR134). Initial interviews with these cases revealed that both had eaten food from the Green Mill in Bloomington in the week before their illness onset. City of Bloomington Environmental Health Division (CBEH) was notified, and an investigation was initiated.

Methods

Cases were defined as individuals who tested positive for S. Braenderup with PFGE pattern BR134, or a Green Mill – Bloomington patron who developed diarrhea (≥3 stools in a 24-hour period) that was at least 3 days in duration or was accompanied by a fever, after eating food from the restaurant. Stool samples collected from consenting individuals were submitted to the MDH PHL for bacterial and viral testing. PFGE and whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on isolates.

MDH staff collected online orders, information for catering groups, and receipts from April 5, 8, 9, and 10, and patrons were called to find additional cases and controls.

All restaurant employees were required to submit two stool samples to the MDH PHL for Salmonella testing. Any employee reporting illness on or after March 15 was excluded from work in food service until two consecutive stool samples tested negative for Salmonella by culture. Employees who tested positive for Salmonella by culture were excluded until two consecutive stool samples tested negative.

Results

Eighty-nine restaurant patrons and 18 additional catered training event attendees were interviewed. Seven cases (7%) were identified, including five laboratory-confirmed cases. Two patrons reported illness but did not meet the case definition and were excluded from further analysis. Cases reported meal dates of March 22 (n=1), April 5 (n=3), April 8 (n=4), April 9 (n=3), April 10 (n=3). Four cases had 2 to 3 meal dates. Onsets of illness ranged from March 29 to April 16. The median age of cases was 39 years (range, 6 to 65 years), and four (57%) cases were male. All seven cases reported diarrhea and cramps, five (71%) fever, one (14%) vomiting, and one (14%) bloody stool. Four (57%) cases visited a healthcare provider, but none were hospitalized or died. The median incubation for the three cases with only one meal date was 115 hours (range, 1.5 to 175 hours).

Three laboratory-confirmed cases attended the same training event catered by the Green Mill restaurant on April 8, 9, and 10. All other cases were sit-down restaurant patrons or had take-out. One case tested negative for Salmonella, and the other case did not return a stool kit. In a univariate analysis including all laboratory-confirmed cases and controls from the catered training event and restaurant patrons from April 5 and 8, there were no significant findings. At the ingredient level, consumption of diced tomatoes (5 of 5 cases vs. 18 of 60 controls; odds ratio [OR], undefined; p = 0.004), any tomatoes (5 of 5 cases vs. 21 of 60 controls; OR, undefined; p < 0.008) and romaine lettuce (5 of 5 cases vs. 23 of 60 controls; OR, undefined; p < 0.012) were significantly associated with illness. In a multivariable analysis, no items remained independently associated with illness, likely because of the high degree of collinearity between tomatoes and romaine lettuce.

CBEH sanitarians visited Green Mill on April 19. All 53 employees were interviewed, and 5 employees were excluded because they reported vomiting, diarrhea, or fever since March 17. The illness onset dates for employees were April 1, April 9, April 11, April 19, and April 24. All five of these employees negative twice for Salmonella on their first two samples.

Two employees who did not initially report any gastrointestinal symptoms tested positive for S. Braenderup that matched by PFGE and whole genome sequencing to patron isolates. Both positive employees were banquet servers. One positive employee reported not having any gastrointestinal symptoms, and worked on April 5, 8, 9, and 10. The second positive employee, who initially reported having no illness, later reported diarrhea, chills, and abdominal pain but was unable to identify an onset date. This employee worked on April 5.

Sanitarians identified numerous issues. The Victory produce wash was plumbed to the 3-compartment sink. The paper towel dispenser was empty on the cook line. An employee was observed touching pizza with bare hands. An employee was observed rinsing the pizza cutter in the hand sink. The pressure gauge was not functional on the dish washing machine.

Fresh produce, including tomatoes and romaine lettuce, were delivered on the morning of April 5. Tomatoes are rinsed with Victory wash in the sink, diced or sliced, and then stored in the walk-in cooler and line flip top cooler. The romaine lettuce is delivered pre-cut and pre-shredded. Food for catered banquets and restaurant patrons are prepared in different areas.

Conclusion

This was an outbreak of S. Braenderup infections associated with the Green Mill restaurant in Bloomington and identified through routine disease surveillance. Tomato and romaine lettuce consumption were statistically associated with illness. Two banquet servers tested positive for the outbreak strain of S. Braenderup. Food workers infected with Salmonella may have been the source of contamination, but other sources of contamination could not be ruled out.

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that contact with pig ear dog treats is the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about animal contact in the week before they became ill. Thirty-four (89%) of 38 ill people reported contact with a dog before getting sick. Of 24 people with available information, 17 (71%) reported contact with pig ear dog treats or with dogs who were fed pig ear dog treats. Both of these proportions are significantly higher than the results from a survey of healthy people who reported contact with dogs (61%) or handling dog treats, such as pig ears (16%), in the week before interview.

Officials from the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development gathered pig ear dog treats at retail locations where ill people reported buying the products. They sampled pig ears for Salmonella. Although the outbreak strain was not identified, other strains of Salmonella were. Investigators are checking to see if any human illnesses are linked to those strains. Retail locations where sampling occurred have removed pig ears from shelves.

A common supplier of pig ear dog treats has not been identified.

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- infections linked to contact with pig ear dog treats.

As of July 2, 2019, a total of 45 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- have been reported from 13 states.

California – 1

Illinois – 3

Indiana – 3

Iowa – 12

Kansas – 3

Massachusetts – 2

Michigan – 7

Missouri – 3

New York – 6

North Dakota – 1

Pennsylvania – 2

South Carolina – 1

Wisconsin – 1

Total – 45

Illnesses started on dates ranging from November 18, 2018, to June 13, 2019. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 81 years, with a median age of 23. Half (50%) of ill people are female. Of 39 ill people with information available, 12 (31%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate papaya outbreak of Salmonella Uganda infections.

As of June 26, 2019, a total of 62 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Uganda have been reported from 8 states – Texas, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 14, 2019, to June 8, 2019. Most illnesses have occurred since April 2019. Ill people range in age from 1 to 86 years, with a median age of 60. Fifty-three percent of ill people are female. Of 35 people with available information, 23 (66%) have been hospitalized. No deaths attributed too Salmonella have been reported. Of 33 ill people with available information, 22 (67%) reported being of Hispanic ethnicity.

Epidemiologic evidence and early product distribution information indicate that whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico and sold in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island, are a likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 21 people who were interviewed, 16 (76%) reported eating papayas. This proportion was significantly higher than results from a survey pdf icon[PDF – 787 KB] of healthy Hispanic people in the months of January through June in which 13% reported eating papayas in the week before they were interviewed.

Two people who lived in different households got sick in Connecticut after eating papayas purchased from the same grocery store location in the week before becoming ill. This provides additional evidence that papayas are a likely source of this outbreak. One ill person in Florida had traveled to Connecticut in the week before they got sick. Officials are working to gather more information about an ill person in Texas.

The gene that makes salmonella resistant to antibiotics of last resort has finally made its way from Asia to the United States, a new study says.

Researchers isolated the gene mcr-3.1 in a patient who had traveled to China two weeks before falling ill to salmonella, according to research published in the June edition of the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

They found the gene after genome sequencing 100 human stool samples collected between 2014 and 2016.

“This gene was already in the USA since 2016, which is surprising,” Siddhartha Thakur, the director of global public health at North Carolina State University, told UPI. “Colistin is the last resort drug and if the gene for resistance jumps on a plasmid then it spreads faster.”

According to Thakur, the gene made its way from a chromosome to a plasmid in China. This illustrated the possibility it could move back and forth between organisms.

So far, the gene has spread to 30 different countries, Thakur says, illustrating its transmission capability. Of the more than 2,500 salmonella serotypes in existence, Salmonella enterica causes much of the sickness related to the disease in the United States.

“This is exactly what we have seen in our study. It is possible that this gene has spread even more than what we had imagined,” Thakur said. “The major consequence is that we are running out of drugs to treat multi-drug resistant infections. This will lead to higher mortality.”

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, Minnesota Department of Health, and Wisconsin local health departments are working with the Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate an ongoing multi-state outbreak of salmonellosis linked to consumption of certain Del Monte vegetable trays. To date, all ill patients associated with this outbreak, three in Wisconsin and one in Minnesota, have reported consuming a Del Monte vegetable tray purchased from a Wisconsin or Minnesota Kwik Trip location prior to their illness.  Kwik Trip is cooperating with regulatory officials and has removed all Del Monte vegetable trays from their stores. These patients reported becoming ill between April 13 and April 27, 2019. It is possible additional illnesses will be reported due to the delay from when a person becomes ill to when it is reported to public health agencies.

The Del Monte vegetable trays associated with the investigation contain broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and dill dip. Del Monte vegetable trays may also have been distributed to other retailers in Wisconsin. Investigation for product distribution is ongoing. Consumers are advised to not eat the following products:

Del Monte Vegetable Tray (containing broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and dill dip) 6 oz.
Del Monte Vegetable Tray (containing broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and dill dip) 12 oz.

Salmonellosis is caused by consuming food or water contaminated with Salmonella bacteria, or by direct or indirect contact with fecal matter from infected people or animals. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pains, fever, and vomiting that lasts for several days. Bloodstream infections are rare, but can be quite serious in young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. Most people recover from salmonellosis on their own, but may require extra fluids to prevent dehydration. It is important to wash fruits and vegetables before eating them to prevent illness from Salmonella and other bacteria.