Since the last update on October 29, 2021, 84 more sick people were added to this outbreak. As of November 12, 2021, 892 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 38 states and Puerto Rico (see map). Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to October 25, 2021 (see timeline).
Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 101 years, with a median age of 37, and 58% are female. Of 571 people with information available, 183 (32%) have been hospitalized.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Whole genome sequencing of bacteria from 788 people’s samples did not predict any antibiotic resistance. Five people’s samples were predicted to be resistant to one or more of the following antibiotics: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, and ceftriaxone, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of three people’s samples by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory also found no resistance. Most people with Salmonella illness recover without antibiotics. However, if antibiotics are needed, this resistance is unlikely to affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people because it is rare.

FDA published a list of retail establishments that received product recalled by Keeler Family Farms and a list of retail establishments that received product recalled by ProSource Produce LLC. These lists represent the best information currently available to the FDA; however, they may not include all retail establishments that have received the recalled product or may include retail establishments that did not actually receive the recalled product. It is important that you use the product-specific information, available on the Keeler Family Farms recall announcement and the ProSource Produce LLC recall announcement, in addition to these lists of retail stores, when you check the food you have to see if it has been recalled.

FDA has posted a list of additional recalls being conducted by companies that may have received recall onions from ProSource Produce LLC and Keeler Family Farms. This list includes recalls conducted by companies that further processed the onions by using them as ingredients in new products or by repackaging them.

ProSource Produce LLC has voluntarily recalled red, yellow, and white onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, with import dates from July 1, 2021, through August 31, 2021. Additional descriptors used for these onion types may include, but are not limited to, jumbo, colossal, medium, summer and sweet onions. Additional recall information will be made public as soon as it is available from ProSource Inc.

The onions were distributed to wholesalers, broadline foodservice customers, and retail or grocery stores in:

  • 50 lb., 25 lb., 10 lb., 5 lb., 3 lb., and 2 lb. mesh sacks
  • 50 lb., 40 lb., 25 lb., 10 lb., and 5 lb. cartons

And by the following distributors and/or under the following brands:

  • Big Bull
  • Peak Fresh Produce
  • Sierra Madre
  • Markon First Crop.
  • Markon Essentials
  • Rio Blue
  • ProSource
  • Rio Valley
  • Sysco Imperial

Keeler Family Farms has recalled red, yellow, and white whole, fresh onions imported from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, with import dates from July 1, 2021, through August 25, 2021. The onions were distributed in 25lb and 50lb mesh sacks. They contain a label that is marked as “MVP (product of MX)”.

Additional details regarding the recalled products are available on the Keeler Family Farms recall announcement.

Recalls have also been initiated by companies that sold recalled onions or products containing the recalled onions.

The CDC reports as of October 28, 2021, 808 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states and Puerto Rico. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to October 13, 2021. Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 101 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 505 people with information available, 157 (31%) have been hospitalized. These numbers are likely to grow.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $800 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.

Additional Resources:

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella is a bacterium that causes one of the most common intestinal illnesses in the US: salmonellosis. There are many different types, or serotypes, of Salmonella, but they all can cause similar symptoms.

How do you get Salmonella?

The Salmonella bacteria can be present in uncooked or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs, or unpasteurized (raw) dairy products, as well as other foods contaminated during harvest, production, or packaging. Recent outbreaks have been linked to contaminated peanut products, alfalfa sprouts, and cantaloupe.

What are the signs and symptoms of Salmonella?

Symptoms can begin 6 to 72 hours from consumption, and include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and/ or vomiting. Dehydration is a concern, especially in the elderly and very young.

What to do if you become infected with Salmonella?

Seek medical attention. Ask your healthcare provider to test a sample of your stool to confirm or rule out Salmonella infection. The CDC estimates that for every culture-con- firmed case of Salmonella in the US, 39 cases go undetected; many cases of “stomach flu” may be salmonellosis. Most illnesses resolve within 1-2 weeks, but in rare cases, serious complications like bacteremia or reactive arthritis can develop.

How to prevent a Salmonella infection:

Cook poultry to the safe temperature of 165 degrees; use a digital thermometer to check. Avoid undercooked or raw eggs and products containing them. Prevent cross contamination by washing your hands after cooking with raw meats, and thoroughly cleaning all surfaces that you or the raw meat touched (counters, cutting boards, sinks, knives, etc.) Wash hands after handling animals and before eating; pay special attention to hand hygiene when visiting animals at state fairs or petting zoos.

Salame Sticks:  As of October 22, 2021, 20 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- have been reported from eight states – California 8, Illinois 2, Kansas 1, Michigan 3, Minnesota 3, New Jersey 1, New York 1 and Virginia 1. Illnesses started on dates ranging from September 18, 2021, to October 3, 2021

Sick people range in age from 2 to 75 years, with a median age of 11. Most of the sick people (80%) are younger than 18, and 65% are female. Of 11 people with information available, 3 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

CDC is advising not to eat, sell, or serve Citterio brand Premium Italian-Style Salame Sticks regardless of where they were purchased.

Crab:  According the the Maine CDC and press reports, two people were hospitalized after a salmonella outbreak linked to crabmeat from Hardie’s Crabmeat in Deer Isle, officials said. Maine CDC is investigating a total of five cases linked to the outbreak.

The cases include four Maine residents and one New Hampshire resident.

Maine CDC and the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry discovered the crabmeat was likely contaminated during preparation and packaging. Health officials recommend packages of Hardie’s Crabmeat purchased between June 15 and Aug. 15 be thrown away.

Onions: The CDC reported a few moments ago that as of October 18, 2021, 652 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 30, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 417 people with information available, 129 (31%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified ProSource Inc. as a common supplier of imported onions to many of the restaurants where sick people ate. One of these clusters occurred in a restaurant where investigators identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg in a condiment container with leftover lime and cilantro. The sick person reported that the condiment cup had also contained onions, although none were left when the condiment was tested. FDA is working to determine if other suppliers of onions may be linked to this outbreak or if there is a common supplier of onions in Chihuahua, Mexico.

(San Antonio, Texas) The first lawsuit has been filed by Ching-yi Ortiz, on behalf of her minor A.O., against Success Foods Management Group, LLC., Torchy’s Tacos, and ProSource Produce, LLC. In this Salmonella lawsuit linked to onions, the plaintiff is represented by Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, and the Hill Law Firm of San Antonio. The case was filed in the District Court of Bexar County, Texas. Cause #2021C121491

On August 21, 2021, the plaintiff (A.O.) ate dinner at Torchy’s Tacos, located at 18210 Sonterra Place, San Antonio, TX 78258. A week later, he began to experience exhaustion and a headache. His symptoms progressed over the next ten days with increasing intensity. He developed a fever, diarrhea, and sharp pain in his lower back. He was taken to the Prestige Emergency Room on September 3, 2021, but an examination failed to yield a diagnosis.

On September 7, 2021, A.O. was in such intense pain he could not walk or sit up. Due to the severity of symptoms, he was taken to the Methodist Children’s Hospital where he received a diagnosis of Salmonella Oranienburg infection and began treatment for complications in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

The Salmonella Oranienburg infection caused A.O. to develop sepsis, organ failure, pneumonia, acidosis, thrombocytopenia, a pericardial effusion, and interstitial emphysema.  He also felt extreme pain as the infection reached the bones around his sacroiliac joint. Currently, A.O. continues to be treated daily with long term IV antibiotics for Salmonella Oranienburg, which was found in his blood, urine, and stool. His treatment is ongoing as the physicians address his related complications.

As of October 18, 2021, the CDC reported that 652 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 30, 2021. Of those sickened, 129 have been hospitalized.

“A.O. is one of the 652 people with Salmonella Oranienburg linked to the consumption of onions,” stated food safety attorney, Bill Marler of Marler Clark. “In 28 years representing victims of foodborne illness, A.O. is one of the sickest Salmonella cases I have seen for someone that survived,” added Marler.

The FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified ProSource Inc. as a common supplier of imported onions to many of the restaurants where sick people ate.  They are working to determine if other suppliers of onions may be linked to this outbreak or if there is a common supplier of onions in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. We have brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart. If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The CDC reported a few moments ago that as of October 18, 2021, 652 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 37 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 30, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 37, and 57% are female. Of 417 people with information available, 129 (31%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 193 people with information, 145 (75%) reported eating or maybe eating raw onions or dishes likely containing raw onion before they became sick. Several ill people reported eating at the same restaurants, indicating they may be part of illness clusters. These clusters can provide clues about what food item may be making people sick. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there. States identified 20 illness clusters at restaurants where onions were served. Information from these clusters shows that many ill people ate raw onions.

FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified ProSource Inc. as a common supplier of imported onions to many of the restaurants where sick people ate. One of these clusters occurred in a restaurant where investigators identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg in a condiment container with leftover lime and cilantro. The sick person reported that the condiment cup had also contained onions, although none were left when the condiment was tested. FDA is working to determine if other suppliers of onions may be linked to this outbreak or if there is a common supplier of onions in Chihuahua, Mexico.

A total of 36 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from 11 states. The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from February 21, 2021, to August 16, 2021 (see timeline). Sick people ranged in age from 1 to 83 years, with a median age of 38 years, and 57% were female. Of 32 people with information available, 12 were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. Of the 27 people interviewed, 14 (52%) reported preparing and eating frozen breaded stuffed chicken products. They bought different brands of raw frozen breaded stuffed chicken products from multiple stores.

Public health investigators used the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that were part of this outbreak. CDC PulseNet manages a national database of DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. DNA fingerprinting is performed on bacteria using a method called whole genome sequencing (WGS).

WGS showed that bacteria from sick people’s samples were closely related genetically. This suggests that people in this outbreak got sick from the same food.

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture collected five raw frozen breaded stuffed chicken products from a grocery store where a sick person purchased these products. Testing identified the outbreak strain in two samples of Kirkwood’s Chicken Cordon Bleu. USDA-FSIS and Indiana officials collected unopened packages of Kirkwood Chicken, Broccoli and Cheese from a sick person’s house for testing and identified the outbreak strain in the product. USDA-FSIS investigated and found that these products were produced at facility P-2375.

The following frozen, raw chicken products that are breaded, pre-browned, and stuffed have been recalled:

  • Dutch Farms Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Milford Valley Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Milford Valley Chicken Cordon Bleu (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken, Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken Cordon Bleu (lot code BR 1056; best if used by Feb 25 2023)

The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have many years of experience working with clients on Salmonella outbreak lawsuits.

Salmonella is one of the most common intestinal infections in the United States. Salmonellosis (the disease caused by Salmonella) is the second most common foodborne illness.

It is estimated that:

· 1.4 million cases of salmonellosis occur each year in the U.S.

· 95% of those cases are foodborne-related

· Approximately 220 of each 1000 cases result in hospitalization and eight of every 1000 cases result in death

· About 500 to 1,000 or 31% of all food-related deaths are caused by Salmonella infections each year

Salmonella infection occurs when the bacteria are ingested, typically from food derived from infected food-animals, but it can also occur by ingesting the feces of an infected animal or person. Food sources include raw or undercooked eggs/egg products, raw milk or raw milk products, contaminated water, meat and meat products, and poultry. Raw fruits and vegetables contaminated during slicing have been implicated in several salmonella outbreaks.

The Marler Clark Salmonella lawyers have unmatched experience representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. We have represented thousands of Salmonella victims and are the only lawyers in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on plaintiff foodborne illness litigation.

Our Salmonella lawyers have represented victims of notable Salmonella outbreaks such as the 2004 Sheetz and Coronet Foods tomato Salmonella outbreak, the 2009 PCA peanut Salmonella outbreak, and the 2011 Cargill ground turkey antibiotic-resistant Salmonella outbreak. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

Salmonella Outbreak Lawsuits


Illnesses began May 30, 2021 and now has spread to 36 states.

As of October 14, 2021, 592 people infected with the outbreak strain of SalmonellaOranienburg have been reported from 36 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 29, 2021.

Texas, Oklahoma, Virginia, Maryland, and Illinois are hardest hit.

Alabama 3, Arkansas 12, California 8, Colorado 1, Connecticut 4, Florida 5, Georgia 2, Illinois 34, Indiana 1, Iowa 3, Kansas 10, Kentucky 9, Louisiana 4, Maryland 45, Massachusetts 11, Michigan 9, Minnesota 22, Mississippi 2, Missouri 10, Nebraska 8, New Jersey 5, New Mexico 8, New York 5, North Carolina 11, North Dakota 4, Ohio 6, Oklahoma 92, Oregon 2, Pennsylvania 6, South Carolina 3, South Dakota 7, Tennessee 10, Texas 149, Utah 3, Virginia 54, and Wisconsin 24.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 36, and 57% are female. Of 363 people with information available, 116 (32%) have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

The CDC reported today, as of October 7, 2021, 102 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Thompson have been reported from 14 states.  The majority of sick people are either Colorado residents or reported traveling to Colorado in the week before they got sick. Only two people did not report travel to Colorado in the week before they got sick. Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 11, 2021, to September 7, 2021.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 to 85 years, with a median age of 39, and 53% are female. Of 89 people with information available, 19 have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Colorado state health officials and FDA traced the source of seafood served at restaurants and sold at grocery stores in Colorado where sick people ate or shopped. FDA determined that Northeast Seafood Products of Denver, Colorado, was the supplier of seafood to most of these locations.

During an FDA inspection of the Northeast Seafood Products facility, FDA collected environmental samples and identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Thompson in the facility.

On October 8, 2021, Northeast Seafood Products of Denver, Colorado, recalled certain types of seafood processed at their facility since October 7, 2021, including Haddock, Monkfish, Bone-in Trout, Grouper, Red Snapper, Red Rock Cod, Ocean Perch, Pacific Cod, Halibut, Coho Salmon, Atlantic Salmon Portions, Lane Snapper, Tilapia, All Natural Salmon Fillet, Pacific Sole, and Farm Raised Striped Bass.

The CDC reports today that since the last update on September 23, 2021, 140 more people were added to this outbreak. As of September 29, 2021, 419 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 35 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2021, to September 14, 2021.

Alabama 1, Arkansas 8, California 6, Connecticut 4, Florida 5, Georgia 2, Illinois 28, Indiana 1, Iowa 1, Kansas 9, Kentucky 9, Louisiana 4, Maryland 22, Massachusetts 10, Michigan 6, Minnesota 20, Mississippi 2, Missouri 5, Nebraska 6, New Jersey 5, New Mexico 8, New York 3, North Carolina 7, North Dakota 2, Ohio 5, Oklahoma 63, Oregon 1, Pennsylvania 4, South Carolina 2, South Dakota 7, Tennessee 2, Texas 111, Utah 2, Virginia 38 and Wisconsin 10.

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 91 years, with a median age of 37, and 56% are female. Of 214 people with information available, 66 (31%) have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local officials have collected food items from some of the restaurants where sick people ate. The outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg was found in a sample taken from a takeout condiment cup containing cilantro and lime. The sick person reported that the condiment container also contained onions, but none were left in the cup when it was tested.

The CDC reports that because multiple food items were present in the container and in the sample that was tested, it is not possible to know which food item was contaminated. We are using this information in conjunction with other available information to help narrow the list of possible foods linked to illness.