Salmonella – Wood Ear Mushrooms

A total of 55 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanley were reported from 12 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 21, 2020, to September 19, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 2 to 74 years, with a median age of 28. Fifty-seven percent of ill people were female. Of 48 ill people with information available, 6 hospitalizations were reported. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback information showed that wood ear mushrooms distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., were the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 23 people with information, 22 (96%) reported eating ramen at a restaurant in the week before their illness started. Several people reported eating at the same ramen restaurants, showing they may have been part of illness clusters.

A foodborne illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. Investigating illness clusters can provide critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there.

Five illness clusters were identified at restaurants serving ramen in three states. Ten (91%) of the 11 ill people linked to restaurant clusters reported eating wood ear mushrooms or ramen containing wood ear mushrooms in the week before their illness started.

FDA and states conducted a traceback investigation from four of the restaurants with illness clusters to identify the source of the wood ear mushrooms eaten by ill people. Traceback determined that Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., supplied wood ear mushrooms (dried fungus) to these restaurants.

On September 23, 2020, Wismettac Asian Foods recalled dried fungus due to possible Salmonella contamination. On October 1, 2020, the California Department of Public Health identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanley in recalled dried fungus samples.

Salmonella – Peaches

A total of 101 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from 17 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 27, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 43. Sixty-four percent of ill people were female. Of 90 ill people with available information, 28 hospitalizations were reported. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicated that peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company were the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 62 people with information, 50 (81%) reported eating fresh peaches in the week before their illness started. This percentage was significantly higher than results from a survey of healthy people in which 20% reported eating peaches in the week before they were interviewed. Of the 40 people who reported information on how the peaches were packaged, 25 (63%) reported buying loose peaches and the remaining 15 reported buying pre-bagged peaches.

The FDA and regulatory officials in several states collected records from grocery stores where ill people reported buying peaches. These records showed that loose and bagged peaches distributed by Wawona Packing Company, LLC, were sold at multiple grocery stores where ill people bought peaches.

On August 22, 2020, Prima Wawona recalled bagged and bulk, or loose, peaches that they supplied to retailers nationwide. See FDA’s notice for a list of recalled products. Recalled products are past their shelf life and should no longer be available in stores.

Salmonella – Onions

A total of 1,127 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport were reported from 48 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2020, to September 11, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 to 102 years, with a median age of 41. Fifty-eight percent of ill people were female. Of 705 ill people with information available, 167 people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence showed that red onions from Thomson International Inc. were the likely source of this outbreak. Other onion types (such as white, yellow, or sweet yellow) were also likely to be contaminated because the onions were grown and harvested together.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Ninety-one percent of people reported eating onions or foods likely containing onions in the week before their illness started. Of the 208 people who were asked what types of onions they ate, 137 (66%) ate red onions, 130 (63%) ate white onions, and 110 (53%) ate yellow onions. Most ill people reported eating more than one type of onion.

FDA and states reviewed records where ill people purchased or ate onions and foods containing onions. This traceback investigation identified Thomson International Inc. as the likely source of red onions.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) also investigated an outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections in Canada that was related genetically by WGS to the U.S. outbreak. Their investigation identified red onions from Thomson International Inc. as the likely source of their outbreak.

On August 1, 2020, Thomson International Inc. recalled all red, yellow, white, and sweet yellow onions because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. Other companies also recalled onions or foods made with recalled onions.

A total of 101 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from 17 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 27, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 43. Sixty-four percent of ill people were female. Of 90 ill people with available information, 28 hospitalizations were reported. No deaths were reported.

In Canada total, there were 57 confirmed cases of Salmonella Enteritidis illness linked to this outbreak in two provinces: Ontario (41) and Quebec (16). Individuals became sick between June and August 2020. Twelve individuals were hospitalized. No deaths were reported. Individuals who became ill were between 0 and 91 years of age. The majority of cases (60%) were female.

Whole genome sequencing analysis showed that an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Canada was related genetically to this outbreak in the United States. This means that people in both outbreaks were likely to share a common source of infection.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicated that peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company were the likely source of this outbreak.

The FDA and regulatory officials in several states collected records from grocery stores where ill people reported buying peaches. These records showed that loose and bagged peaches distributed by Wawona Packing Company, LLC, were sold at multiple grocery stores where ill people bought peaches.

On August 22, 2020, Prima Wawona recalled bagged and bulk, or loose, peaches that they supplied to retailers nationwide. See FDA’s notice for a list of recalled products. Recalled products are past their shelf life and should no longer be available in stores.

Meijer, in conjunction with Eagle Produce, LLC in Aguila, AZ., is announcing a voluntary recall of whole cantaloupe and select cut cantaloupe fruit trays and bowls. The recall is part of a sampling investigation by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and is due to the potential risk of Salmonella.

Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The multi-state recall involves whole cantaloupe and select cut cantaloupe fruit trays and bowls in various weights ranging from 6–40 ounces sold between Sept. 26 and Oct. 5 of this year at all Meijer stores in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Wisconsin. There have been no illnesses reported to date.

The recalled whole cantaloupe would have a sticker label stating Kandy Brand from Eagle Produce, LLC. If there is no sticker label to identify it, then it should be considered part of the recall. In addition, Meijer may have used cantaloupe ingredients that originated from Eagle Produce, LLC in the store made products. The following packaged products are in clear plastic containers under the Meijer brand label include:

9450 – Gas Station Mixed Melon Chunk Cup
9505 – Gas Station Mixed Fruit Cup
9644 –  Gas Station Cantaloupe  6 oz
21921000000 – Fruit Frenzy Bowl 40 oz
21921400000 – Fruit Tray
21924800000 – Fruit Tray with Dip
21932300000 – Cantaloupe Chunks Large PLU 4960
21933400000 – Mixed Melon Chunks Large Bowl
21933700000 – Mixed Melon Chunks Small Bowl
21960100000 – Fruit Frenzy 16 oz Bowl PLU
21971100000 – Strawberry/Pineapple Cup 6 oz
21971200000 – Mixed Fruit Cup 6 oz
21971700000 – Berry Explosion Cup 6 oz
21971800000 – Mixed Melon Chunk Cup 6 oz
21984400000 – Mixed Melon Cup
22012400000 – Mixed Fruit Cup
22019600000 – Cantaloupe Chunks Small Bowl
22020000000 – Fruit Frenzy 32 oz Bowl PLU 1
22021900000 – Cantaloupe and Honeydew Slices
22022000000 – Mixed Melon Slices
22045000000 – Fruit Palooza
22045200000 – Melons & Berries
22045300000 – Triple Treat & Melon
22061600000 – Cantaloupe Chunks Large Kosher
22061700000 – Cantaloupe Chunks Large Kosher
28873400000 – Fruit Salad

Seneca Snack Company, a Washington Corporation, is announcing a voluntary recall of Seneca Cinnamon Apple Chips and Clancy’s Cinnamon Apple Chips due to possible Salmonella contamination.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting in the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections, endocarditis and arthritis.

This recall is only for specific cinnamon flavor lot codes, no other flavor apple chips are affected. This only affects Clancy’s product sold by ALDI and Seneca products sold nationwide through Amazon and Gemline, no other retailers are affected.

Seneca was notified by an ingredient supplier that it shipped one lot of ingredients containing cinnamon that has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. In response to that notification; Seneca is now retrieving Cinnamon Apple Chips from its distribution system.

The recall extends to the following labels and package sizes ONLY:

Seneca Cinnamon Apple Chips 2.5 ounce Package
UPC: 0 18195-70100 8
-Individual Package Codes:
28JUN2021

Seneca Cinnamon Apple Chips 0.7 ounce Package
UPC: 0 18195-70140 4
-Individual Package Codes:
26JUN2021

Clancy’s Cinnamon Apple Chips 2.5 ounce Package
-Individual Package Codes:
26JUN2021
27JUN2021

As of September 24, 2020, a total of 41 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanley have been reported from 10 states – Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, New Jersey, New York City, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 21, 2020, to August 26, 2020. Ill people range in age from 2 to 74 years, with a median age of 27. Sixty-two percent of ill people are female. Of 32 ill people with information available, 4 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback information show that wood ear mushrooms distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., are the likely source of this outbreak.

The California Department of Public Health collected dried fungus at one of the restaurants linked to an illness cluster for testing. Testing identified Salmonella in a sample of dried fungus distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc. WGS analysis is being done to determine if the Salmonella identified in the dried fungus is the same as the Salmonella from ill people.

On September 24, 2020, Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc., issued a recallof all Shirakiku imported dried fungus after the California Department of Public Health found Salmonella in the product.

Restaurants should not sell or serve recalled wood ear mushrooms distributed by Wismettac Asian Foods, Inc.

As of August 31, 2020, a total of 1,012 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport have been reported from 47 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2020, to August 11, 2020. Ill people range in age from less than 1 to 102 years, with a median age of 40. Fifty-seven percent of ill people are female. Of 581 ill people with information available, 136 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

As of August 31, 2020, there have been 457 confirmed cases of Salmonella Newport illness linked to this outbreak in the following provinces: British Columbia (107), Alberta (257), Saskatchewan (33), Manitoba (25), Ontario (11), Quebec (23) and Prince Edward Island (1).

Individuals became sick between mid-June and early August 2020. Sixty-six individuals have been hospitalized. One individual has died, but it is not known if Salmonella contributed to the cause of death. Individuals who became ill are between 1 and 100 years of age. The majority of cases (55%) are female.

Whole genome sequencing analysis shows that an outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections in Canada is related genetically to this outbreak in the United States. This means that people in both of these outbreaks are likely to share a common source of infection.

Thirty-four illness clusters have been identified in 13 states. Information was collected on 23 of the 34 clusters at restaurants and grocery stores. Information from these clusters shows that many ill people ate red onions and other types of onions. Investigations conducted by states and FDA determined that all 23 restaurants and grocery stores served or sold red, yellow, or white onions. Seventeen of the 23 (74%) served red onions, 13 (57%) served yellow onions, and 10 (43%) served white onions.

The traceback information collected from several of these illness clusters identified Thomson International, Inc., of Bakersfield, California, as a likely source of red onions. Due to the way onions are grown and harvested, other onion types, such as white, yellow, or sweet yellow, are also likely to be contaminated. Traceback is ongoing to determine if other onions are linked to the outbreak.

In the United States, as of August 27, 2020, a total of 78 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from 12 states

Connecticut 1, Iowa 8, Kentucky 1, Maryland 1, Michigan 17, Minnesota 23, Missouri 1, New Jersey 7, New York 9, Pennsylvania 2, Virginia 3, Wisconsin 5

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 3, 2020. Ill people range in age from 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 44. Sixty-four percent of ill people are female. Of 67 ill people with available information, 23 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

In Canada, as of August 23, 2020, there have been 33 confirmed case of Salmonella Enteritidis illness linked to this outbreak in two provinces: Ontario (22) and Quebec (11).

Individuals became sick between June and August 2020. Three individuals were hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 0 and 91 years of age. The majority of cases (55%) are female.

On August 22, 2020, Prima Wawona recalled bagged and bulk, or loose, peaches that they supplied to retailers nationwide.

The firm’s press states it is recalling “bulk/loose peaches distributed and sold from June 1 through August 3 and its bagged Wawona and Wawona Organic peaches distributed and sold from June 1 through August 19th because the products could possibly be contaminated with Salmonella.”

The bagged peaches were distributed and sold in supermarkets with the following product codes:

  • Wawona Peaches – 033383322001
  • Wawona Organic Peaches – 849315000400
  • Prima® Peaches – 766342325903
  • Organic Marketside Peaches – 849315000400
  • Kroger Peaches – 011110181749
  • Wegmans Peaches – 077890490488

For bagged peaches, the product codes may be found at the bottom of each package. All affected peaches may be found in stores nationwide.

Retailers that received recall product from Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company include, but are not limited to:

State health and food safety officials are warning Minnesota consumers not to eat fresh, whole peaches supplied by Wawona Packing Company and purchased at retail locations including Aldi and Target after linking Salmonella infections to the produce.

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and several other states, are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to consumption of fresh, whole peaches supplied by Wawona Packing Company.

Ill people reported purchasing peaches from Aldi, Target, and possibly other retail locations. On August 19, Aldi announced a recall of peaches from Wawona Packing Company, including both loose and bagged peaches (ALDI Voluntarily Recalls Assorted Peaches from Wawona Packing Company LLC Due to Possible Salmonella Enteritidis Contamination (PDF)). Target is also in the process of removing peaches from its stores.

Twenty-three Minnesotans have been identified as part of this outbreak, with a median age of 28 years (range, 3 to 92 years). The patients became ill between July 12 and Aug. 3. Six were hospitalized and all have recovered. As of this afternoon, there have been at least 68 cases of Salmonella Enteritidis infection identified in nine states. The investigation is ongoing and more cases may be detected.

Health officials recommend throwing out or returning fresh, whole peaches supplied by Wawona Packing Company. Do not eat them. Other peaches (including frozen or canned peaches) are not known to be affected. Fresh peaches supplied by other companies are not known to be affected. If people are unsure whether the peaches they bought are supplied by Wawona, they should contact the retail location where they were purchased. If they have any doubts about where their peaches came from, they should not eat them and should throw them away.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection include diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever. Symptoms usually begin within 12 to 96 hours after exposure, but they can begin up to two weeks after exposure. Infections usually clear in five to seven days, but about 28% of laboratory-confirmed cases require hospitalization. Many Salmonella infections in otherwise healthy people do not require medical treatment. More serious infections occasionally occur. For those who seek health care, most do not require antibiotics. However, antibiotic treatment may be warranted in some cases. If you’ve consumed these products, become ill and are concerned about your health, consult your health care provider.

In Canada, as of August 7, 2020, there have been 239 confirmed cases of Salmonella Newport illness linked to this outbreak in the following provinces:

Alberta (149)

British Columbia (67)

Manitoba (13)

Saskatchewan (5)

Ontario (3)

Quebec (1)

Prince Edward Island (1)

In the United States, as of August 7, 2020, a total of 640 confirmed cases of Salmonella Newport illness linked to this outbreak in the following states:

Utah (90)

Oregon (85)

California (76)

Montana (52)

Illinois (41)

Michigan (36)

Idaho (26)

Washington (25)

Iowa (20)

South Dakota (17)

Wyoming (16)

Arizona (14)

Minnesota (14)

Colorado (14)

Nebraska (10)

Pennsylvania (9)

Nevada (8)

North Dakota (8)

Ohio (8)

Virginia (8)

Wisconsin (7)

Missouri (6)

Alaska (6)

New York (5)

North Carolina (5)

Tennessee (5)

Maine (4)

Florida (3)

Connecticut (2)

West Virginia (2)

Indiana (2)

Kansas (2)

Massachusetts (2)

Mississippi (2)

New Jersey (2)

Delaware (1)

Georgia (1)

Kentucky (1)

Maryland (1)

New Hampshire (1)

New Mexico (1)

South Carolina (1)

Alabama (1)

According to Canada, as of July 30, 2020, there have been 114 confirmed cases of Salmonella Newport illness linked to this outbreak in the following provinces: British Columbia (43), Alberta (55), Manitoba (13), Ontario (2), and Prince Edward Island (1). The individual from Prince Edward Island reported traveling to Alberta before becoming ill. Saskatchewan has not reported any confirmed illnesses related to this outbreak, but provincial public health authorities are investigating some Salmonella Newport illnesses in the province.

Individuals became sick between mid-June and mid-July 2020. Information is available for 102 illnesses. Out of 102 people, 16 individuals have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 3 and 100 years of age. The majority of cases (56%) are female.

Individuals who became ill reported eating red onions at home, in menu items ordered at restaurants and in residential care settings. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation. If contaminated food products are identified, CFIA will take the necessary steps to protect the public, including recalling the product as required.

According to Canada, the U.S. CDC is also investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Newport illnesses that have a similar genetic fingerprint to illnesses reported in this outbreak. Investigators in Canada and the U.S. continue to collaborate to exchange information and identify commonalities in the outbreak information that may identify additional sources of illness or help to identify the cause of contamination in the red onions.

The United States has been silent since July 24, 2020.  As of July 23, 2020, a total of 212 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport have been reported from 23 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2020, to July 11, 2020, Ill people range in age from 0 to 92 years, with a median age of 40. Fifty-four percent of ill people are female. Of 117 ill people with information available, 31 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

Whole genome sequencing analysis of 48 isolates from ill people did not predict any antibiotic resistance. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory is currently underway.

On July 10, 2020, CDC PulseNet identified an outbreak of 13 Salmonella Newport infections in three states. Since being identified, the outbreak has rapidly grown to a total of 212 infections in 23 states.

State and local public health officials are interviewing ill people to determine what they ate and other exposures in the week before their illness started. CDC encourages people experiencing symptoms of a Salmonella infection to report their illness to their local health department and participate in these interviews. This information is vital for public health officials to identify the source of this outbreak and to take steps to prevent additional illnesses.

At this time, the investigation has not identified a specific food, grocery store, or restaurant as the source of this outbreak. CDC will provide more information as it becomes available.