King Arthur Flour Company is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity (6,300 cases) of Organic Coconut Flour (16 oz.), after testing revealed the presence of Salmonella in 1 pouch of Organic Coconut Flour (16 oz.).

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and produce more severe illnesses.

The recalled Organic Coconut Flour (16 oz.) was distributed through retailers and distributors nationwide.

The only product affected by the recall is Organic Coconut Flour (16 oz.) with Best If Used By Dates of 10/25/2018 LOT: CF22017E and 12/04/2018, LOT: CF22017E which can be found on the back of the pouch, near the bottom of the panel. UPC: 0 71012 10702 5

According to the CDC, as of March 20, 2018, 13 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium have been reported from 8 states. WGS performed on bacteria isolated from ill people showed that they were closely relatedly genetically. This means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from September 22, 2017 to February 26, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 73 years, with a median age of 40. Sixty-seven percent are female. Three hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that dried coconut is the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Seven (88%) of eight people interviewed reported eating dried coconut from grocery stores. Of the seven people who reported eating dried coconut, four people purchased the product at different Natural Grocers store locations. Public health officials continue to interview ill people to learn more about what they ate in the week before becoming sick.

FDA and state health and regulatory officials collected leftover dried coconut from ill people’s homes, as well as dried coconut from Natural Grocers store locations where ill people shopped and from the Natural Grocers’ Distribution Center. FDA testing identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium in an unopened sample of Natural Grocers Coconut Smiles Organic collected from Natural Grocers. The outbreak strain was also identified in an opened, leftover sample of Natural Grocers Coconut Smiles Organic collected from an ill person’s home.

FDA also collected dried coconut from International Harvest, Inc. The outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was identified in samples of International Harvest Brand Organic Go Smile! Dried Coconut Raw and Go Smiles Dried Coconut Raw.

On March 16, 2018, International Harvest, Inc. recalled bags of Organic Go Smile! Raw Coconut and bulk packages of Go Smiles Dried Coconut Raw. The recalled Organic Go Smile! Raw Coconut was sold online and in stores in 9-ounce bags with sell-by dates from January 1, 2018 through March 1, 2019. Recalled bulk Go Smiles Dried Coconut Raw was sold in a 25-pound case labeled with batch/lot numbers OCSM-0010, OCSM-0011, and OCSM-0014. These products were sold in various grocery stores. Regulatory officials are working to determine where else Organic Go Smile! Raw Coconut and Go Smiles Dried Coconut Raw were sold.

On March 19, 2018, Vitamin Cottage Natural Food Markets, Inc. recalled packages of Natural Grocers Coconut Smiles Organic labeled with barcode 8034810 and packed-on numbers lower than 18-075. Recalled Natural Grocers Coconut Smiles Organic were sold in 10-ounce clear plastic bags with the Natural Grocers label. The packed-on number can be found in the bottom left-hand corner of the label.

 

 

In cooperation with the Taylor Farms recall of diced yellow onions that may be contaminated with Salmonella, 12 Haggen stores are voluntarily recalling deli products that contain raw Taylor Farms brand diced yellow onions.

Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis, and arthritis.

The following recalled products were sold in the deli from the full-service and/or self-service cases and packaged in clear containers. The sell-by date was printed on the scale label that is affixed to the product’s packaging:

Product Name

First six digits of
the UPC code

Sell-by dates

Old Fashion Potato Salad

202932

3/15/18 up to and including 3/19/18

Cashew Chicken Salad

202928

3/15/18 up to and including 3/19/18

Turkey Curry Salad

202986

3/15/18 up to and including 3/19/18

The following recalled products were sold in the deli from the self-service case. The sell-by date was printed on the scale label that is affixed to the product’s packaging:

Product Name

First six digits of
the UPC code

Sell-by dates

Cashew Chicken Salad Wrap

203681

3/15/18 up to and including 3/19/18

Cashew Chicken Croissants (2-pack)

203908

3/15/18 up to and including 3/19/18

Cashew Chicken Croissant Tray

203812

3/15/18 up to and including 3/19/18

Tartar Sauce

202804

3/13/18 up to and including 3/27/18

The cashew chicken products were packaged on a tray with a clear plastic cover. The tartar sauce was packaged in a clear 12 oz. container. The recalled tartar sauce was also offered as a condiment with made-to-order Fish & Chips from the deli:

Product Name

First six digits of
the UPC code

Purchase dates

Tartar Sauce (Served as a condiment
with made-to-order Fish & Chips)

206000; 206001;
206004; 206006

3/13/18 up to and including 3/17/18

The products were sold at the following Haggen stores:

  • 31565 State Route 20 #1, Oak Harbor, WA 98277
  • 2814 Meridian, Bellingham, WA 98225
  • 757 Haggen Drive, Burlington, WA 98223
  • 1313 Cooper Point Road SW, Olympia, WA 98502
  • 2900 Woburn Street, Bellingham, WA 98226
  • 26603 72nd Avenue NW, Stanwood, WA 98292
  • 1301 Avenue D, Snohomish, WA 09290
  • 1815 Main Street, Ferndale, WA 98248
  • 17641 Garden Way NE, Woodinville, WA 98072
  • 2601 East Division, Mount Vernon, WA 98273
  • 8915 Market Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258
  • 3711 88th Street NE, Marysville, WA 98270

No illnesses associated with this recall have been reported to date.

The CDC reports as of March 6, 2018, 170 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Typhimurium have been reported from 7 states. Illness Count Iowa (149), Illinois (9), Nebraska (5), Minnesota (3), South Dakota (2) Indiana (1), Texas (1).

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 8, 2018, to February 18, 2018. Ill people range in age from 7 to 89 years, with a median age of 59. Sixty-six percent of ill people are female. 62 hospitalizations and no deaths have been reported.

Illnesses that occurred after February 12, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of two to four weeks.

WGS analysis did not identify predicted antibiotic resistance in 67 of 72 isolates (70 ill people and 2 food samples). Five isolates from ill people contained genes for resistance to all or some of the following antibiotics: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. This resistance is unlikely to affect the treatment of most people, but some infections might be difficult to treat with antibiotics usually prescribed and may require a different antibiotic. Testing of outbreak isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing methods is currently underway in CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS)laboratory.

State and local health officials continue to interview ill people to ask about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 159 people interviewed, 131 (82%) reported eating chicken salad from Fareway stores. Triple T Specialty Meats, Inc. produced the chicken salad that ill people reported eating.

It takes an average of two to four weeks from when a person becomes ill with Salmonella to when the illness is reported to CDC or health officials. Because of this reporting lag, the additional 105 people added to this investigation likely became ill from eating chicken salad recalled by Triple T Specialty Meats, Inc. which is no longer available for purchase. The last reported illness began on February 18, 2018.

The Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment (WCDPHE) continues to investigate an outbreak of Salmonella illness at several locations in Weld County. The source of the outbreak is the Burrito Delight restaurant, which has voluntarily closed both of its locations in Fort Lupton and Dacono. It is still under investigation as to what is the specific source. The investigation continues around possible food sources.

To date, there are 21 laboratory-confirmed cases of Salmonella and the number of probable cases continues to rise.  There have been 4 hospitalizations.

The breakdown of the laboratory-confirmed cases by county includes:

  • Weld = 14
  • Larimer = 3
  • Bolder = 2
  • Morgan = 1
  • Adams = 1

Cases by Event

  • Aims Event on February 6th = 3
  • Aims Event on February 12th = 9
  • Restaurant Dine-in (Ft. Lupton) = 5
  • Takeout to Place of Employment = 4

Cases by Restaurant

  • Fort Lupton = 20
  • Dacono = 1

Symptoms of Salmonella illness include diarrhea, upset stomach, fever, and occasionally vomiting. Symptoms typically last 4 to 7 days, and most people recover on their own. Anyone who suspects they became ill should contact their health care provider. For some people, the diarrhea may become so severe that they require hospitalization. Symptoms typically appear 6-72 hours after eating contaminated food and will typically last for 4 to 7 days without treatment. However, in severe cases, the symptoms may last longer.

The Weld County Health Department has created a “Salmonella Investigation Report Update” that can be found at: www.weldhealth.org (Click on Health Hot Topics).

For anyone who suspects they became sick with Salmonella in February, please call the Weld County Health Department Salmonella triage line: 970.400.2374 (staffed M-F, 8-5; messages can be left after hours).

A non-staffed hotline (available 24/7), is also available at: 970.400.4457.

The Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment (WCDPHE) continues to investigate an outbreak of Salmonella illness at several locations in Weld County. The source of the outbreak is the Burrito Delight restaurant, which has voluntarily closed both of its locations in Fort Lupton and Dacono. It is still under investigation as to what is the specific source. Laboratory testing results of the employees will not be available until Monday. The investigation continues around possible food sources.

There are presently 12 confirmed Salmonella cases which occurred in February: 6 from two different catered events at Aims Community College; 4 from patrons who ate at the Fort Lupton Burrito Delight restaurant; and 2 from a private business that had another catered event. The restaurants are closed and the public is not at risk.

Symptoms of Salmonella illness include diarrhea, upset stomach, fever, and occasionally vomiting. Symptoms typically last 4 to 7 days, and most people recover on their own. Anyone who continues to experience symptoms should contact their health care provider. For some people, the diarrhea may become so severe they require hospitalization. Symptoms typically appear 6-72 hours after eating contaminated food and will typically last for 4 to 7 days without treatment. However, in severe cases, the symptoms may last longer.

The Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment (WCDPHE) is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella illness at Aims Community College. This illness may be associated with catered events held at Aims on February 9 and February 13, 2018. The February 9 event has 1confirmed Salmonella case that had about 70 people attend. The February 13 event has 2 confirmed cases that was attended by 400 people. Of the 8 confirmed Salmonella cases, 6 adults reside in Weld County, 1 in Larimer, and 1 in Boulder county. The events were catered by an outside restaurant, the Burrito Delight, located in Fort Lupton. The public is not at risk and the restaurant is now closed for the duration of the investigation.

“Salmonella is a bacteria that causes symptoms like diarrhea, upset stomach, fever, and occasionally vomiting,” said Mark E. Wallace, MD, MPH, Executive Director of the Weld County Health Department. “Symptoms typically last 4 to 7 days, and most people recover on their own. Anyone who suspects they became ill should contact their health care provider.” For some people, the diarrhea may become so severe that they require hospitalization. Symptoms typically appear 6-72 hours after eating contaminated food and will typically last for 4 to 7 days without treatment. However, in severe cases, the symptoms may last longer.

28 sick – Confirmed Case Definition:

Persons with Salmonella Typhimurium (confirmed or visual match to Pattern JPXX01.0275) with illness onset since January 1, 2018 reporting consumption of chicken salad from Fareway (any store) in the 7 days prior to illness onset.

66 sick – Probable Case Definition:

Persons that are epi linked to a confirmed case (all confirmed cases are laboratory confirmed), OR Persons who test positive by CIDT or culture (with serotype and PFGE pending) with illness onset since January 1, 2018 reporting consumption of chicken salad from Fareway (any store) in the 7 days prior to illness onset.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert out of an abundance of caution due to concerns about illnesses reported in the state of Iowa that may be caused by Salmonella associated with a chicken salad product. This product was sold at all Fareway grocery stores in Iowa, as well as Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota.

Minnesota has one case associated with this outbreak so far, in a Martin County resident.

The chicken salad item for this public health alert was produced between Dec. 15, 2017 and Feb. 13, 2018. The following product is subject to the public health alert:

  • Varying weights of “Fareway Chicken Salad” sold in plastic deli containers with a Fareway store deli label.

This product was shipped to all Fareway grocery stores in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota and sold directly to consumers who shopped at Fareway.  The problem was discovered following reports of illness in Iowa.

On Feb. 9, 2018, the Iowa Department of Public Health notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella related illnesses, within the state of Iowa.  FSIS continues to work with public health partners at the Iowa Department of Public Health and Department of Inspections and Appeals on this investigation. Updated information will be provided as it becomes available.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals (DIA) today jointly issued a consumer advisory for chicken salad sold at Fareway stores. The chicken salad, which is produced and packaged by a third party for Fareway, is implicated in multiple cases of salmonella illness across Iowa. Preliminary test results from the State Hygienic Laboratory (SHL) at the University of Iowa indicate the presence of salmonella in this product.

Fareway voluntarily stopped the sale of the product and pulled the chicken salad from its shelves after being contacted by DIA. “The company has been very cooperative and is working with IDPH and DIA in the investigation of the reported illnesses,” said DIA Food and Consumer Safety Bureau Chief Steven Mandernach, who noted that no chicken salad has been sold to the consuming public since last Friday evening (2/9/18).

IDPH is investigating multiple cases of possible illness associated with the chicken salad. “The bottom line is that no one should eat this product,” said IDPH Medical Director, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk. “If you have it in your refrigerator, you should throw it away.”

The woman is identified at Denise Castaneda of Westminster according to the Adams County coroner.

We talked with her mother who says they ordered take-out carnitas at La California. Soon after Denise started throwing up. Her mother says Denise was hospitalized, had surgery and then she died. “I`m pretty upset. She died not knowing what she had. I didn`t expect her to die before me. I didn`t get as sick,” Denise’s mother told us.

FOX31 first brought you the story Thursday of 33 people who were sickened after they ate at La California restaurant in Aurora in November 2017. The Tri-County Health Department said the salmonella outbreak killed one person and three others were hospitalized. La California is at East 17th Avenue and Peoria Street.

The health department said lab tests show the family combination meal might have led to the poisoning. The meal includes ingredients such as meat, beans and cilantro.

But investigators could not pinpoint what started the outbreak.

The health department said the outbreak affected people who ate at La California from Nov. 4-26. Almost all of the people infected experienced diarrhea and abdominal cramping.

La California earned an “F” in the Restaurant Report Card for 30 critical violations in its March 2015 health inspection.