Today the CDC reported that it, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

As of September 7, 2018, 14 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Alabama and Tennessee.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 10, 2018 to August 7, 2018 Ill people range in age from 1 year to 94, with a median age of 31. Fifty percent are female. Of 9 people with information available, 2 (22%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicates that shell eggs from Gravel Ridge Farms in Cullman, Alabama are a likely source of the outbreak.

On September 8, 2018, Gravel Ridge Farms recalled cage-free large eggs because they might be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis bacteria. Recalled eggs were sold in grocery stores and to restaurants in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. The FDA website has a list of the grocery stores where recalled eggs were sold. Consumers who have any Gravel Ridge Farms cage-free large eggs in their homes should not eat them. Return them to the store for a refund or throw them away. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell recalled Gravel Ridge Farms cage-free large eggs.

Gravel Ridge Farms is recalling Cage Free Large Eggs due to a potential contamination of Salmonella. The recall was initiated because reported illnesses were confirmed at locations using Gravel Ridge Farm Eggs, and we are voluntarily recalling out of an abundance of caution.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

On 9/6/2018 the firm was notified by FDA that the product they supplied may be contaminated with Salmonella. 

Products affected are:

Product Size UPC Use By Dates
Gravel Ridge Farms
Large Cage Free Eggs
Single Dozen and 2.5 Dozen Flats 7-06970-38444-6 7/25/18 through 10/3/18

The products were distributed between 6/25/2018 and 9/6/2018. These products were packaged in a cardboard container and sold primarily in restaurants and retail stores in AL, GA, and TN. Consumers who have purchased these products can return to store for refund or discard the product immediately. If any consumers have Gravel Ridge Farms eggs in their refrigerator, they should be discarded, regardless of the date stamped on the package. Consumers with questions may call Dustin Smith at 205-363-1105 M-F Between 8AM and 4PM Central Time.

The following retail stores carried the product:

Atlanta

Candler Park Market

Grant Park Market

Westview Corner Market

Sevananda Natural Foods

The Merchantile

Birmingham

Piggly Wiggly Clairemont

Piggly Wiggly River Run

Piggly Wiggly Crestline

Piggly Wiggly Bluff Park

Piggly Wiggly Dunnavent Valley

Piggly Wiggly Warrior

Piggly Wiggly Homewood

Western Market Mt. Brook

Western Market Rocky Ridge

Foodland Eva

Warehouse Discount Grocery Hanceville

Warehouse Discount Grocery Cullman 2 locations

Foodland Priceville

Star Market Huntsville

Manna Grocery Tuscaloosa

The company has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and the company continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and Doniphan County Health Department continue to investigate an outbreak associated with an election day Indian Taco Dinner at the Highland United Methodist Presbyterian Church in Highland, Kansas on August 7, 2018.

A survey was launched on August 10, 2018 to collect illness and exposure information from those that attended the dinner.

As of August 31, 2018, 115 persons have completed the survey, 69 have reported gastrointestinal illnesses, and 14 have tested positive for Salmonella Newport. These numbers are preliminary.

Testing of food that was served at the dinner has been completed and all tested negative for Salmonella except for a sample of tomatoes that tested positive for the same strain of Salmonella Newport. Tomatoes were provided by multiple people so an environmental assessment of the sources of tomatoes is planned to potentially determine how this contamination occurred.

In addition, KDHE is assessing whether other persons that did not attend the taco dinner could have been sickened from consuming these tomatoes.

The Larimer County Department of Health and Environment (LCDHE) is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella illness at La Luz Mexican Restaurant in Old Town Fort Collins. As of August 21, there are six confirmed cases with additional cases pending investigation and testing. Some of the confirmed cases have been hospitalized.

La Luz has been proactive in collaborating with the Health Department to try and identify the source of the outbreak.  La Luz is primarily concerned with the safety of its customers and integrity of its food supply and wants to prevent any further illness as best they can. Out of concern for its customers and employees, La Luz has voluntarily closed until more is known about the outbreak.

Salmonella are bacteria that can cause infections affecting the intestinal tract, urinary tract, bloodstream or other body tissues. Salmonella is often spread to people through food consumption.  The bacteria can be found in many food items including raw meats, eggs, produce. Salmonella can be spread through people who are sick who handle food. Some people who are infected are asymptomatic and can spread the infection unknowingly.

Symptoms may include, diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, vomiting and bloody stool. Symptoms typically appear 6-72 hours after eating contaminated food and will usually last for 4 to 7 days. In severe cases, the symptoms may last longer or require hospitalization.

Hy-Vee, Inc., based in West Des Moines, Iowa, is voluntarily recalling its Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad due to the potential that it may be contaminated with Salmonella. The potential for contamination was brought to Hy-Vee’s attention last night when approximately 20 illnesses in Minnesota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa were potentially linked back to customers consuming the salad. The voluntary recall includes Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salads in both 1 pound (16 oz.) and 3 pound (48 oz.) containers produced between June 1, 2018, and July 13, 2018, and available from the deli service case.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The pasta salad was distributed to all of Hy-Vee’s 244 grocery stores across its eight-state region of Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin. The product comes in a plastic container with a plastic lid. The expiration date range is between June 22, 2018, and Aug. 3, 2018. The expiration date can be found on the side of the container.

Out of an abundance of caution, Hy-Vee voluntarily removed the product last night from all of its shelves and service cases as soon as the grocery chain was notified about the situation.

As of July 12, 2018, 100 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandaka have been reported from 33 states.

Illnesses started on dates from March 3, 2018, to July 2, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than one year to 95, with a median age of 57. Of ill people, 68% are female. Out of 77 people with information available, 30 (39%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses that occurred after June 19, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when their illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

State and local health officials continue to interview ill people and ask questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Fifty-five (85%) of 65 people interviewed reported eating cold cereal. In interviews, 43 people specifically reported eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. Ill people in this outbreak reported this cereal more often than any other cereals or food items.

Health officials in several states collected Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal from retail locations and ill people’s homes for testing. Laboratory testing identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandaka in a sample of unopened Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal collected from a retail location in California. Laboratory testing also identified the outbreak strain in samples of leftover Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal collected from the homes of ill people in Montana, New York, and Utah.

The Kellogg Company recalled all Honey Smacks products that were on the market within the cereal’s one-year shelf-life. However, Honey Smacks products with earlier dates could also potentially be contaminated. Do not eat Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal of any size package or with any “best if used by” date.

As of June 14, 2018, 73 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandaka have been reported from 31 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

Illnesses started on dates from March 3, 2018, to May 28, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than one year to 87, with a median age of 58. Sixty-five percent are female. Out of 55 people with information available, 24 (44%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses that occurred after May 22, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella Infection for more details.

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is a likely source of this multistate outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Thirty (77%) of 39 people interviewed reported eating cold cereal. In interviews, 14 people specifically reported eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. Ill people in this outbreak reported this cereal more often than any other cereals or food items.

On June 14, 2018, the Kellogg Company recalled packages of Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.

As of June 18, 2018, 70 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Adelaide have been reported from seven states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from April 30, 2018, to June 3, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 97, with a median age of 67. Sixty-seven percent are female. Out of 63 people with information available, 34 (54%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses that occurred after May 28, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella infection for more details.

Epidemiologic and preliminary traceback evidence indicates that pre-cut melon supplied by Caito Foods, LLC of Indianapolis, Indiana is a likely source of this multistate outbreak. Most of the ill people reported eating pre-cut cantaloupe, watermelon, or a fruit salad mix with melon purchased from grocery stores. Information collected from stores where ill people shopped indicates that Caito Foods, LLC supplied pre-cut melon to these stores.

WHAT IS SALMONELLA?

Salmonella is the second most common intestinal infection in the United States. More than 7,000 cases of Salmonella were confirmed in 2009; however, the majority of cases go unreported. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 1 million people in the U.S. contract Salmonella each year, and that an average of 20,000 hospitalizations and almost 400 deaths occur from Salmonella poisoning, according to a 2011 report.

Salmonella infection usually occurs when a person eats food contaminated with the feces of animals or humans carrying the bacteria.  Salmonella outbreaks are commonly associated with eggs, meat and poultry, but these bacteria can also contaminate other foods such as fruits and vegetables. Foods that are most likely to contain Salmonella include raw or undercooked eggs, raw milk, contaminated water, and raw or undercooked meats.

Salmonella is generally divided into two categories. Non-typhoidal Salmonella is the most common form and is carried by both humans and animals. Most serotypes of Salmonella, such as Salmonella Javiana and Salmonella Enteritidis cause non-typhoidal Salmonella.  Typhoidal Salmonella, which causes typhoid fever, is rare, and is caused by Salmonella Typhi, which is carried only by humans.

SYMPTOMS OF SALMONELLA INFECTION

Symptoms of Salmonella infection, or Salmonellosis, range widely, and are sometimes absent altogether. The most common symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Typical Symptoms of Salmonella infection: Appear 6 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food and last for 3 to 7 days without treatment.

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal Cramps
  • Fever of 100 F to 102 F

Additional symptoms:

  • Bloody diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Headache
  • Body Aches

Typhoid Fever Symptoms: Symptoms of typhoid fever appear between 8 and 14 days after eating contaminated food and last anywhere from 3 to 60 days. They include a fever of 104 F, weakness, lethargy, abdominal pain, coughing, nosebleeds, delirium, and enlarged organs. Typhoid fever is a serious illness that can result in death.

COMPLICATIONS OF SALMONELLA

Complications of Salmonella poisoning are more likely to occur among young children and people age 65 or older. Possible complications include:

Reactive ArthritisReactive arthritis is thought to occur in 2 to 15 percent of Salmonella patients. Symptoms include inflammation of the joints, eyes, or reproductive or urinary organs. On average, symptoms appear 18 days after infection.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): IBS is one disorder in a spectrum of common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Symptoms of IBS can include constipation, diarrhea, alternating diarrhea and constipation, abdominal pain, urgency, bloating, straining at stools, and a sense of incomplete evacuation.

Focal Infection: A focal infection occurs when Salmonella bacteria takes root in body tissue and causes illnesses such as arthritis or endocartitis. It is caused by typhoidal Salmonella only.

SALMONELLA TREATMENT

Salmonella infections generally last 3 to 7 days, and often do not require treatment. People with severe dehydration may need rehydration through an IV.

Antibiotics are recommended for those at risk of invasive disease, including infants under three months old. Typhoid fever is treated with a 14-day course of antibiotics.

Unfortunately, treatment of Salmonella has become more difficult as it has become more resistant to antibiotics. Finding the right antibiotic for a case of Salmonella is crucial to treating this bacterial infection.

PREVENTION OF SALMONELLA INFECTION

These safety measures can help prevent Salmonella poisoning:

  • Wash your hands before preparing food and after handling raw meats
  • Cook meat and eggs thoroughly until they reach an internal temperature of 160 F (71 C)
  • Do not eat foods containing raw eggs or milk, such as undercooked French toast
  • Avoid cooking raw meat in the microwave, as it may not reach a high enough internal temperature to kill Salmonella bacteria and may be unevenly cooked
  • Avoid bringing uncooked meat into contact with food that will not be cooked (i.e. salad)
  • Wash hands with soap after handling reptiles or animal feces
  • Always wash your hands after going to the bathroom

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR SALMONELLA

About-Salmonella.com is a comprehensive site with in-depth information about Salmonella bacteria and Salmonellosis.

SalmonellaLitigation.com is a Website that provides information about lawsuits and litigation brought on behalf of victims of Salmonella outbreaks nationwide.  The site provides extensive information about sources of Salmonella outbreaks.

Salmonella Blog provides up-to-date news related to Salmonella outbreaks, research, and more.

As of June 14, 2018, 73 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandaka have been reported from 31 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

Illnesses started on dates from March 3, 2018, to May 28, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than one year to 87, with a median age of 58. Sixty-five percent are female. Out of 55 people with information available, 24 (44%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is a likely source of this multistate outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Thirty (77%) of 39 people interviewed reported eating cold cereal. In interviews, 14 people specifically reported eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. Ill people in this outbreak reported this cereal more often than any other cereals or food items.

On June 14, 2018, the Kellogg Company recalled 15.3 oz. and 23 oz. packages of Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.

Recalled Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal have a “best if used by” date from June 14, 2018 through June 14, 2019. The “best if used by” date is on the box top.

The recalled 15.3 oz. Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal has a UPC code of 38000 39103. The recalled 23.0 oz. Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal has a UPC code of 38000 14810. The UPC code is on the bottom of the box.

The FDA, CDC, along with state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections. CDC reports that fruit salad mixes that include pre-cut melons are a likely source of this outbreak.

FDA advises consumers not to eat recalled fresh cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and fresh-cut fruit medley products containing any of these melons produced at the Caito Foods facility in Indianapolis, Indiana. Products produced at this facility have been distributed in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The products were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers and distributed to Costco, Jay C, Kroger, Payless, Owen’s, Sprouts, Trader Joe’s, Walgreens, Walmart, and Whole Foods/Amazon. Caito Foods, LLC has voluntarily recalled fruit salad mixes that contain pre-cut melons to prevent further distribution of potentially contaminated products.

The CDC reports that 60 people in five Midwestern states have become ill. Among 47 people with information available, thirty-one cases (66%) have been hospitalized.

The 60 illnesses occurred within the period of April 30, 2018 to May 28, 2018.

The FDA is working with CDC, along with state partners in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Iowa, and Ohio to trace back the pre-cut melons to identify the source to determine the full distribution of pre-cut melons, and to learn more about the potential route of contamination.

As this is an ongoing investigation, the FDA will update this page as more information becomes available, such as product information, epidemiological results, and recalls.

Additional distribution information has been added that identifies retail locations that received potentially contaminated product. The FDA is advising consumers to discard any recalled products purchased at the listed locations. The FDA is sharing this information with consumers as soon as possible and additional distribution information may be added as it becomes available. It is possible that some stores may be mentioned more than once because they received more than one shipment or more than one product. Consumers may wish to ask a firm directly if the recalled product was available for sale.

Consumers who have symptoms of Salmonellainfection should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. Most infections usually lasts 4 to 7 days and most people recover without treatment, however some people develop diarrhea so severe that they need to be hospitalized.

The FDA, CDC, along with state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections. Epidemiologic and preliminary traceback evidence indicates that pre-cut melon distributed by Caito Foods, LLC is a likely source of this outbreak. Caito Foods, LLC has voluntarily recalled their products, to prevent further distribution of potentially contaminated products. The recalled products were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers and distributed in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Wisconsin. The FDA is currently working with state partners to trace back the pre-cut melons to identify the source of the pathogen, to determine the full distribution of the pre-cut melons, and to learn more about how the contamination occurred.

There are 60 people ill with this strain of Salmonellain five states: IL (6), IN (11), MI (32), MO (10), OH (1). The ages of the ill people range from less than one year to 97 (median 67 years) and 65% of cases are female. Reported illness onset dates range from 4/30/18 – 5/28/18. Among 47 with available information, 31 (66%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is reporting 60 cases from five states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio. The CDC investigation indicates pre-cut melons, including fruit salads, are a likely source of this multistate outbreak.

“The Illinois Department of Public Health is urging people not to eat pre-cut melon purchased from any Walmart store in Illinois, or any of the other affected states, at this time,” said IDPH Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D. “If you have recently purchased pre-cut melon from Walmart, throw it out. If you have recently eaten pre-cut melon from a Walmart store and experience diarrhea, fever, and cramps, contact your health care provider.”

Illinois cases range in age from 23 to 87 years and have been reported in all regions of the state. Therefore, it is recommended that people not eat pre-cut melon from Walmart stores anywhere in Illinois. As the investigation continues, additional grocery stores may be added.

Most people affected by Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after eating food contaminated by the bacteria. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment. However, diarrhea for some people may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. The CDC has indicated there have been more hospitalizations with this outbreak than what is typically seen. The elderly, infants, and those with compromised immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is working to identify the source of Salmonella and there may be recalls as more information is learned. Walmart stores in Illinois have removed pre-cut melons linked to this outbreak from their shelves.

So far only pre-cut melons have been linked, but it’s important to remember food safety measures if you buy whole melons. Make sure to wash the melons before you start cutting. Also make sure you’ve washed your hands and all utensils¾knives and cutting boards, and don’t let fresh fruits and vegetables come into contact with raw meat.