Thirty-eight people from three states are sick with salmonella that may be linked to ground beef processed at Safeway stores,  the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service says.

The shipments with the salmonella contaminated beef were received between Sept. 19 and Nov. 5 in five states – California, Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada and New Mexico – Safeway said in a statement Thursday.

Safeway issued the statement in response to a USDA public health alert, citing illnesses from Salmonella Newport related to fresh ground beef products.

The FSIS public health alert said there was "an association" between the fresh ground beef products and 38 illnesses reported from Arizona, California, Idaho and Nevada.

The USDA advised consumers to look for and discard fresh ground beef products with the Sept. 19-Nov. 5 dates.

The tainted beef isn’t subject to an official recall because it’s been so long since it was sold.  In the meantime, however, it made too many people sick.

  • Putting the “Safe” back in Safeway
    The year’s latest foodborne illness outbreak involving a drug resistant strain of Salmonella in Safeway beef illustrates that farm animals are playing a critical role in the development and spread of drug resistant human pathogens. Just recently, we learned that pigs are reservoir for drug resistant Staph. The Salmonella found in ConAgra potpies, Salmonella I 4,[5], 12:i- also exhibits antibiotic resistance.
    While controls downstream from these reservoirs are very important, much more needs to be done to control pathogens at their source. Farmers up until recently have not practiced food safety. Agriculture must be brought fully into the food safety model. We talk about Farm to Table food safety systems like HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, (see http://www.safefoods.tv) but we have few laws requiring farmers to produce safe food, or at least not make the food unduly dangerous by their production methods.
    Legal attention has not focused on the farm environment for a number of reasons, first the scale of the problem, second lack of a systematic formula for safe farming operations, and most importantly the historic relationships that exist within FDA and USDA.
    In regards liability for farmers, its there. Soon we will be able to trace infected raw materials back to its source on the farm.
    Processors, manufacturers and retailers who wish to stay out of legal problems are putting more emphasis on a safe supply of food. Its time for our public health agecnies to find the capacity to regulate producers; they have a duty to protect the public. Farmers must stop acting like they are immune from responsibility. I have to believe that use of antibiotics in livestock for any other reason than to combat an infection is poor practice regardless of the legality of using antibiotics for other purposes.
    Groups like the Food Safety Leadership Council, a powerful but low-key group of the largest buyers of food in the country are concentrating now on produce safety for good reason and requiring a scientific pathogen control program. There should also be a concerted effort to bring this same message home to the cattle industry. We must start working now on how to prevent infected cattle, and cattle colonized with increasingly dangerous and difficult to treat human pathogens from reaching the processor level.
    It is going to take ALL producers of our nation’s food, to put the “safe”- back in Safeway.

  • Putting the “Safe” back in Safeway
    The year’s latest foodborne illness outbreak involving a drug resistant strain of Salmonella in Safeway beef illustrates that farm animals are playing a critical role in the development and spread of drug resistant human pathogens. Just recently, we learned that pigs are reservoir for drug resistant Staph. The Salmonella found in ConAgra potpies, Salmonella I 4,[5], 12:i- also exhibits antibiotic resistance.
    While controls downstream from these reservoirs are very important, much more needs to be done to control pathogens at their source. Farmers up until recently have not practiced food safety. Agriculture must be brought fully into the food safety model. We talk about Farm to Table food safety systems like HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point, (see http://www.safefoods.tv) but we have few laws requiring farmers to produce safe food, or at least not make the food unduly dangerous by their production methods.
    Legal attention has not focused on the farm environment for a number of reasons, first the scale of the problem, second lack of a systematic formula for safe farming operations, and most importantly the historic relationships that exist within FDA and USDA.
    In regards liability for farmers, its there. Soon we will be able to trace infected raw materials back to its source on the farm.
    Processors, manufacturers and retailers who wish to stay out of legal problems are putting more emphasis on a safe supply of food. Its time for our public health agencies to find the capacity to regulate producers; they have a duty to protect the public. Farmers must stop acting as if they are immune from responsibility. I have to believe that use of antibiotics in livestock for any other reason than to combat an infection is poor practice regardless of the legality of using antibiotics for other purposes.
    Groups like the Food Safety Leadership Council (FSLC), a powerful but low-key group of the largest buyers of food in the country are concentrating now on produce-safety for good reason. The FSLC is requiring a scientific pathogen control program for growers. There should also be a concerted effort on the part of retailers and processors alike to bring this same message home to the cattle industry. We must start working now on how to prevent infected cattle, and cattle colonized with increasingly dangerous and difficult to treat human pathogens from reaching the processor and retail levels.
    It is really going to take ALL producers of our nation’s food, to put the “Safe”- back in Safeway.

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    Billings Channel KULR has reported that people in Yellowstone County are infected with Salmonella. KULR also reports that it is the same strain of Salmonella that is making people sick in states as far away as Texas and Pennsylvania. Now,…