The Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment (WCDPHE) is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella illness at Aims Community College. This illness may be associated with catered events held at Aims on February 9 and February 13, 2018. The February 9 event has 1confirmed Salmonella case that had about 70 people attend. The February 13 event has 2 confirmed cases that was attended by 400 people. Of the 8 confirmed Salmonella cases, 6 adults reside in Weld County, 1 in Larimer, and 1 in Boulder county. The events were catered by an outside restaurant, the Burrito Delight, located in Fort Lupton. The public is not at risk and the restaurant is now closed for the duration of the investigation.

“Salmonella is a bacteria that causes symptoms like diarrhea, upset stomach, fever, and occasionally vomiting,” said Mark E. Wallace, MD, MPH, Executive Director of the Weld County Health Department. “Symptoms typically last 4 to 7 days, and most people recover on their own. Anyone who suspects they became ill should contact their health care provider.” For some people, the diarrhea may become so severe that they require hospitalization. Symptoms typically appear 6-72 hours after eating contaminated food and will typically last for 4 to 7 days without treatment. However, in severe cases, the symptoms may last longer.

28 sick – Confirmed Case Definition:

Persons with Salmonella Typhimurium (confirmed or visual match to Pattern JPXX01.0275) with illness onset since January 1, 2018 reporting consumption of chicken salad from Fareway (any store) in the 7 days prior to illness onset.

66 sick – Probable Case Definition:

Persons that are epi linked to a confirmed case (all confirmed cases are laboratory confirmed), OR Persons who test positive by CIDT or culture (with serotype and PFGE pending) with illness onset since January 1, 2018 reporting consumption of chicken salad from Fareway (any store) in the 7 days prior to illness onset.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert out of an abundance of caution due to concerns about illnesses reported in the state of Iowa that may be caused by Salmonella associated with a chicken salad product. This product was sold at all Fareway grocery stores in Iowa, as well as Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota.

Minnesota has one case associated with this outbreak so far, in a Martin County resident.

The chicken salad item for this public health alert was produced between Dec. 15, 2017 and Feb. 13, 2018. The following product is subject to the public health alert:

  • Varying weights of “Fareway Chicken Salad” sold in plastic deli containers with a Fareway store deli label.

This product was shipped to all Fareway grocery stores in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota and sold directly to consumers who shopped at Fareway.  The problem was discovered following reports of illness in Iowa.

On Feb. 9, 2018, the Iowa Department of Public Health notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella related illnesses, within the state of Iowa.  FSIS continues to work with public health partners at the Iowa Department of Public Health and Department of Inspections and Appeals on this investigation. Updated information will be provided as it becomes available.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

The woman is identified at Denise Castaneda of Westminster according to the Adams County coroner.

We talked with her mother who says they ordered take-out carnitas at La California. Soon after Denise started throwing up. Her mother says Denise was hospitalized, had surgery and then she died. “I`m pretty upset. She died not knowing what she had. I didn`t expect her to die before me. I didn`t get as sick,” Denise’s mother told us.

FOX31 first brought you the story Thursday of 33 people who were sickened after they ate at La California restaurant in Aurora in November 2017. The Tri-County Health Department said the salmonella outbreak killed one person and three others were hospitalized. La California is at East 17th Avenue and Peoria Street.

The health department said lab tests show the family combination meal might have led to the poisoning. The meal includes ingredients such as meat, beans and cilantro.

But investigators could not pinpoint what started the outbreak.

The health department said the outbreak affected people who ate at La California from Nov. 4-26. Almost all of the people infected experienced diarrhea and abdominal cramping.

La California earned an “F” in the Restaurant Report Card for 30 critical violations in its March 2015 health inspection.

Minnesota health officials say two children in the Twin Cities area got sick from salmonella poisoning after coming in contact with tainted pet food.

The Minnesota Department of Health said Friday that testing found the same salmonella DNA patterns in the siblings. One of the children was hospitalized last month with a painful bone condition.

An investigation found the children’s home contained Raws for Paws Ground Turkey Food, and that the pet food was contaminated.

The contaminated raw turkey pet food was produced on Oct. 12 and sold online on the Raws for Paws website. The product was recalled Monday by the manufacturer.

Health officials are urging pet owners to discard or return pet food with this brand, and to thoroughly clean bowls or surface areas.

Fox 31 News reports that the Tri-County Health Department has confirmed to FOX31’s Erika Gonzalez that one person has died from Salmonella poisoning related to eating at a restaurant in Aurora.

The health department tells FOX31 that 33 people were sickened by eating at La California restaurant on Peoria Street in November 2017. One person died from issues related to salmonella.

The health department says lab tests show the family combo meal may have led to the poisoning.

The health department says the outbreak affected people who ate at La California from November 4 to November 26, 2017.

La California is at 1685 Peoria Street in Aurora.

The health department’s report says 13 of the 33 cases are confirmed, and 20 of the cases are probable for Salmonella. The illnesses involved 32 restaurant patrons and one employee.

Twenty-five cases had exposures at the restaurant with their meals with a 5-day period from November 10 to November 14, 2017.

La California earned an ‘F’ in FOX31’s Restaurant Report Card two years ago for 30 critical violations in its March 2015 health inspection.

The Louisiana’s Department of Health is investigating a Salmonella outbreak in Caldwell Parish that has sickened more than 100 and may have contributed to one death. Local and state authorities trying to determine if the death of a 56-year-old man, Duane Reitzell, was connected to a mass illness.

Samantha Hartmann, press officer for the Louisiana Department of Health, said preliminary tests of samples have returned positive for Salmonella.

As of Thursday, 49 cases of a gastrointestinal illness were confirmed with 31 people hospitalized, the Department of Health reported. The ages of those with a confirmed illness range from 15 to 70.

State officials also reported Thursday samples taken from five people have tested positive for salmonella.

Sheriff Clay Bennett, who also is sick, said more than 100 residents have sought medical treatment. Bennett said workers at the sheriff’s office also fell ill Tuesday afternoon. He said employees ate jambalaya from a local softball fundraiser, but no one was certain about the origin of the illness. Bennett said the illness could have come from anything.

Virginia Health officials say about 150 people living in eight states have been sickened by salmonella after attending a chili cook-off in Virginia.

Dr. David Matson, director of the state’s Eastern Shore Health District, said by phone Wednesday that half of them have sought medical treatment. Some have been hospitalized.

More than 2,000 people attended the 18th Annual Chincoteague Chili Chowder Cook-Off and Car Show on Sept. 30.

Matson said most people sickened by the bacteria have already become ill with diarrhea, vomiting and fever.

Officials are asking cook-off attendees to fill out a survey as they determine the bacteria’s source.

People who’ve gotten sick live in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and North Carolina.

 

A total of 201 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (131), Salmonella Kiambu (57), Salmonella Agona (8), or Salmonella Gaminara (5) have been reported from 23 states.

Sixty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.

This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Thompson, Kiambu, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Two additional outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to imported papayas from two other farms in Mexico, Caraveo Produce and El Zapotanito, have been identified. Available information indicates that illnesses in these two outbreaks are not linked to papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm and are being investigated separately.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche, Caraveo Produce, or El Zapotanito farms in Mexico.

Because three separate outbreaks linked to papayas from different farms have been identified, CDC is concerned that papayas from several other farms in Mexico might be contaminated with Salmonella and have made people sick.

As of August 9, 2017, 141 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51) or Salmonella Thompson (90) have been reported from 19 states. Connecticut 5, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 2, Kentucky 3, Louisiana 2, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 6, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, North Carolina 3, New Jersey 27, New York 39, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Texas 7, Virginia 14, Wisconsin 1, Total 141
Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 39. Among 136 ill people with available information, 83 (61%) are female. Among 98 people with available information, 66 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 103 people with available information, 45 (44%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Illnesses that occurred after July 14, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

Based on information collected to date, CDC is now recommending that consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. If consumers aren’t sure if their Maradol papaya came from the Carica de Campeche farm, they should ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don’t eat it; just throw it out. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

As was reported in the last update on August 4, FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. CDC is working to determine if there are any illnesses with these other types of Salmonella linked to this outbreak.

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico because they are linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis.

Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately.

The CDC reports today that the outbreak investigation has expanded to include another strain of Salmonella.

Sixty-four more ill people from 15 states were added to this investigation since the last update on July 21, 2017.

Six more states have reported ill people: Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Laboratory tests showed that the strain of Salmonella Thompson isolated from papayas collected in Maryland is closely related genetically to clinical isolates from ill people.

FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and found they were contaminated with several types of Salmonella.

A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) or Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states – Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Thirty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At this time, Caribeña brand papayas from Mexico have been identified as one brand linked to the outbreak. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

Through testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. The agency is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico.

Seattle-King County Public Health Friday announced it is investigating a salmonellosis outbreak caused by Salmonella Stanley, an uncommon strain of Salmonella bacteria.

Six persons infected with Salmonella Stanley were reported to Public Health during July 17–July 24.

On July 26-27, genetic fingerprinting results for four of the six cases became available, and all had the same genetic fingerprint, suggesting that they have some common source of infection; genetic fingerprinting for the other two cases is pending.

This fingerprint has only been seen twice before in King County where two to six cases of Salmonella Stanley have been reported annually over the past several years. Public Health is attempting to interview each case to gather information about possible risk factors for infection.

The source of the outbreak is still under investigation.

The median age of the cases is 21 years; three cases are female and three are male. None of the cases are known to have been hospitalized. Additional details on the investigation will be posted as they are available.

Salmonellosis is a bacterial infection that is often spread through the fecal-oral route, through contaminated food and water, or through contact with animals and their environments. Symptoms of salmonellosis include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, and abdominal cramping. Illness typically lasts several days and people can spread infection to others even after symptoms resolve.

To prevent Salmonella infection:

  • Wash hands with soap and water after going to the bathroom, changing diapers, touching animals, and before eating or preparing food.
  • Cook all meats thoroughly, especially poultry.
  • Wash cutting boards and counters used for meat or poultry preparation immediately after use to avoid cross contaminating other foods.