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A total of 201 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (131), Salmonella Kiambu (57), Salmonella Agona (8), or Salmonella Gaminara (5) have been reported from 23 states.

Sixty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.

This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Thompson, Kiambu, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Two additional outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to imported papayas from two other farms in Mexico, Caraveo Produce and El Zapotanito, have been identified. Available information indicates that illnesses in these two outbreaks are not linked to papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm and are being investigated separately.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche, Caraveo Produce, or El Zapotanito farms in Mexico.

Because three separate outbreaks linked to papayas from different farms have been identified, CDC is concerned that papayas from several other farms in Mexico might be contaminated with Salmonella and have made people sick.

As of August 9, 2017, 141 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51) or Salmonella Thompson (90) have been reported from 19 states. Connecticut 5, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 2, Kentucky 3, Louisiana 2, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 6, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, North Carolina 3, New Jersey 27, New York 39, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Texas 7, Virginia 14, Wisconsin 1, Total 141
Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 39. Among 136 ill people with available information, 83 (61%) are female. Among 98 people with available information, 66 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 103 people with available information, 45 (44%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Illnesses that occurred after July 14, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

Based on information collected to date, CDC is now recommending that consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. If consumers aren’t sure if their Maradol papaya came from the Carica de Campeche farm, they should ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don’t eat it; just throw it out. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

As was reported in the last update on August 4, FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. CDC is working to determine if there are any illnesses with these other types of Salmonella linked to this outbreak.

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico because they are linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis.

Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately.

The CDC reports today that the outbreak investigation has expanded to include another strain of Salmonella.

Sixty-four more ill people from 15 states were added to this investigation since the last update on July 21, 2017.

Six more states have reported ill people: Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Laboratory tests showed that the strain of Salmonella Thompson isolated from papayas collected in Maryland is closely related genetically to clinical isolates from ill people.

FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and found they were contaminated with several types of Salmonella.

A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) or Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states – Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Thirty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At this time, Caribeña brand papayas from Mexico have been identified as one brand linked to the outbreak. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

Through testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. The agency is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico.

Seattle-King County Public Health Friday announced it is investigating a salmonellosis outbreak caused by Salmonella Stanley, an uncommon strain of Salmonella bacteria.

Six persons infected with Salmonella Stanley were reported to Public Health during July 17–July 24.

On July 26-27, genetic fingerprinting results for four of the six cases became available, and all had the same genetic fingerprint, suggesting that they have some common source of infection; genetic fingerprinting for the other two cases is pending.

This fingerprint has only been seen twice before in King County where two to six cases of Salmonella Stanley have been reported annually over the past several years. Public Health is attempting to interview each case to gather information about possible risk factors for infection.

The source of the outbreak is still under investigation.

The median age of the cases is 21 years; three cases are female and three are male. None of the cases are known to have been hospitalized. Additional details on the investigation will be posted as they are available.

Salmonellosis is a bacterial infection that is often spread through the fecal-oral route, through contaminated food and water, or through contact with animals and their environments. Symptoms of salmonellosis include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, and abdominal cramping. Illness typically lasts several days and people can spread infection to others even after symptoms resolve.

To prevent Salmonella infection:

  • Wash hands with soap and water after going to the bathroom, changing diapers, touching animals, and before eating or preparing food.
  • Cook all meats thoroughly, especially poultry.
  • Wash cutting boards and counters used for meat or poultry preparation immediately after use to avoid cross contaminating other foods.
The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Kiambu infections.As of July 21, 2017, 47 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu have been reported from 12 states. Illnesses in Iowa, 1, Kentucky, 1, Louisiana, 1, Maryland, 5, Massachusetts, 1, Minnesota, 1, New Jersey, 12, New York, 13, Pennsylvania, 4, Texas, 1, Utah, 1 and Virginia, 6. WGS showed that isolates from people infected with Salmonella Kiambu are closely related genetically. This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to June 28, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 27. Among ill people, 67% are female. Among 31 people with available information, 18 (58%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 33 people with available information, 12 (36%) report being hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence collected to date indicate that yellow Maradol papayas are a likely source of this multistate outbreak. This investigation is ongoing.

An illness cluster in Maryland was identified. An illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. In Maryland, several ill people reported eating papayas purchased from the same location of a grocery store. Salmonella Kiambu and Salmonella Thompson were isolated from samples collected from ill people. Investigating illness clusters provides critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there.

The Maryland Department of Health collected papayas from the grocery store associated with the illness cluster to test for Salmonella. One sample yielded the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu and another sample yielded Salmonella Thompson. Both samples were from yellow Maradol papayas. WGS showed that the Salmonella Kiambu papaya isolate is closely related genetically to the Salmonella Kiambu isolates from ill people. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating contaminated yellow Maradol papayas. CDC is working to collect additional information to determine whether the recent Salmonella Thompson illness in Maryland is part of this multistate outbreak.

Based on the available evidence, CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell yellow Maradol papayas until we learn more.

The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) and the New Haven Health Department (NHHD) are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella infections involving patrons of Cilantro Fresh Mexican Grill, a restaurant at 1158 Whalley Ave. in New Haven, Connecticut.  Cilantro’s owner is cooperating with public health officials and has voluntarily closed the restaurant while the investigation is conducted.

What should people do if they ate at the restaurant during June and feel sick?

Patrons who dined at the restaurant and got sick with fever, nausea, diarrhea, and/or vomiting should consult with their physician, especially if they are still experiencing symptoms.

Patrons with symptoms should not prepare food or drinks for others and should wash their hands with soap and water frequently to prevent spreading the bacteria to others.

Patrons who became or are sick are encouraged to call the Department of Public Health at 860-509-7994 on Monday, July 3rd to report their illness.

What should people do if they ate at the restaurant during June and have no symptoms?

Patrons who dined at Cilantro in June and who do not have any symptoms do not need any special medical evaluation or treatment.

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella bacteria are one of the most common causes of food poisoning in the United States.  Symptoms typically last for four to seven days, and most people get better without treatment.  However, Salmonella can cause more serious illness in certain groups of people, including the elderly, infants and persons with chronic diseases or compromised immune systems.

Salmonella bacteria spread through contaminated food or water.  An individual who is sickened with Salmonella can contaminate food and water, spreading the bacteria to others.  People who are infected with Salmonella should not prepare food or drinks for others until their symptoms have ended.  Restaurant workers and other food handlers who are infected with Salmonella should not return to work until cleared by public health officials.

Napa Valley Register reports several people reported getting sick with Salmonella after eating at Morimoto Napa last month, according to Napa County Public Health.

There are at least six confirmed cases of salmonella-related food borne illnesses in customers who dined at the restaurant on Main Street between Oct. 10 and Oct. 12, said Dr. Karen Relucio, the county’s chief public health officer.

Relucio confirmed that the restaurant has been cooperative. During their investigation, she said, officials found that the restaurant was very clean and organized with strict operating procedures. Although the source of the salmonella outbreak is still under investigation, Relucio said that the department didn’t see any risk of ongoing transmission associated with eating at Morimoto Napa.

Salmonella, a type of bacteria that causes food poisoning, can be found in a variety of different food products, including chicken, beef, pork, eggs, tomatoes and spouts. Eating raw or undercooked food increases the risk of getting sick, Relucio said. The symptoms usually appear between 12 and 72 hours after infection and include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps.

The illness lasts between four and seven days, Relucio said, and most people recover without treatment. Still, she said, if someone gets sick with food poisoning after eating out, they should report it to either Public Health or Environmental Health.

logo-Prime-Time-ProducePrime Time Produce has issued a voluntary product recall for certain lots of cucumbers delivered to multiple locations in Bakersfield due to potential salmonella contamination.

These cucumbers may have been served in salad bars at the following schools between October 19, 2016 through October 28, 2016:

Bakersfield City Schools Greenfield Union School District
Cato Middle School Granite Point Elementary
Chavez Elementary Greenfield Jr. High
College Heights Elementary Horizon Elementary
Eissler Elementary McKee Middle
Fletcher Elementary Ollivier Jr. High
Garza Elementary Palla Elementary
Harding Elementary Planz Elementary
Harris Elementary
Horace Mann Elementary
Jefferson Elementary
Longfellow Elementary
Munsey Elementary
Nichols Elementary
Noble Elementary
Pioneer Elementary
Roosevelt Elementary
Thorner Elementary
Voorhies Elementary
William Penn Elementary

Other locations that may have received these cucumbers are as follows:

San Joaquin Community Hospital
Bakersfield Memorial Hospital
Bakersfield Heart Hospital
California State University, Bakersfield
Logan’s Roadhouse
BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse

Salmonella may cause diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection. Salmonella infection can last 4 to 7 days, and most individuals recover without treatment. There have been no reports of illness due to consumption of this product in Kern County. Anyone concerned about illness should contact their healthcare provider.

Kern County Public Health will continue to monitor this voluntary recall and keep our community updated on any new information.

More than two dozen people in Hawaii have been infected by Salmonella bacteria in an outbreak that is tentatively linked to seaweed (limu or ogo) from an unnamed farm on Oahu. The 14 infected people include children and adults, with four victims have such severe symptoms that they required hospitalization, according to the Hawaii Department of Health. Although encouraging public awareness, the state health department did not release the name of the Oahu farm. The department ordered the farm “to halt operations and advise its customers to remove product from sale immediately.” All of the infected people developed diarrheal illnesses from mid- to late October. Preliminary investigations identified consumption of raw fish, specifically poke that contained limu, as a common factor among the sick people.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert out of an abundance of caution due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with a chicken salad product sold from Costco Store #1190, in Lynwood, Wash.

pha-100916The chicken salad item for this public health alert was produced Aug. 26 through Sept. 2, 2016. The following product is subject to the public health alert:

  • Varying weights of “Costco Rotisserie Chicken Salad”.

This product was sold directly to consumers who shopped at Costco Store #1190 in Lynwood, Wash.

On September 26, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- illnesses in the state of Washington. Working in conjunction with CDC and the Washington State Department of Health, FSIS determined that there is a possible link between rotisserie chicken salad from Costco’s Alderwood store in Lynwood, Wash. and these illnesses. Based on epidemiological evidence, four Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- case-patients have been identified with illness onset dates ranging from September 2 to September 6, 2016. Traceback investigation indicated that three of these case-patients consumed rotisserie chicken salad purchased on August 26, August 31 and September 2, 2016 from this Costco location. No product has tested positive for this strain of Salmonella. Clinical isolates associated with this investigation were tested for antibiotic-resistance, and three isolates from Washington State were found resistant only to tetracycline and susceptible to other antibiotics commonly used to treat salmonellosis. FSIS continues to work with Costco and public health partners on this investigation, and will provide more information as it becomes available.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased this product on August 26, August 31 and September 2, 2016 are urged not to consume it.