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Surveillance & Analysis on Salmonella News & Outbreaks

Detroit’s Henry Ford Hospital Link in Salmonella Cluster

Henry-Ford-HospitalOfficials with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, are trying to unravel how 14 patients in the same hospital unit were sickened last week with Salmonella.

Seven of these people have been discharged, while the other seven remain in the hospital and are isolated from other patients “as an added safety precaution,” according to a Detroit TV station report aired Tuesday night.

Sources at the 802-bed hospital said the outbreak doesn’t appear to be food-related, but they aren’t yet sure.

“No new patients have been identified this week. There’s no evidence at this time that the illness is food related,” a hospital statement read.

“Salmonella can be transmitted basically by anything that enters your mouth, whether it’s a dirty hand, touching something that has Salmonella and touching your mouth, or food,” said Dr. Frank McGeorge, an emergency room physician affiliated with Henry Ford Hospital. “In a hospital setting, it could be just about anything, and that’s where the detective work happens and really has to take place.”

When in Doubt Throw the Salmonella Cucumbers Out

The CDC, multiple states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Poona infections. 671 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona have been reported from 34 states, an increase of 113 cases since the last update on September 22. 131 ill people have been hospitalized, and three deaths have been reported from Arizona (1), California (1), and Texas (1).  51% of ill people are children younger than 18 years.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback investigations have identified cucumbers imported from Mexico and distributed by Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce as a likely source of the infections in this outbreak.

Recalled cucumbers were distributed in the states of Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah. Further distribution to other states may have occurred.

Consumers should not eat, restaurants should not serve, and retailers should not sell any of the recalled cucumbers. If you aren’t sure if your cucumbers were recalled, ask the place of purchase or your supplier. When in doubt, don’t eat, sell, or serve them and throw them out.

Latest on Bi-Costal Fig and Olive Salmonella Outbreak

FPF_Fig and Olive (14)From the Los Angeles Acute Communicable Disease and Control:The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) is participating in a multi-state investigation of Salmonella infections among patrons of the Fig & Olive restaurant, West Hollywood. Twenty persons meeting a clinical definition for Salmonella reported eating at this restaurant between September 6 and September 11, 2015.  Of these, seven have been confirmed by laboratory tests detecting the Salmonella.  Investigation of the cases and their exposures (the foods they ate) is ongoing.  In addition to patrons of the restaurant, three restaurant employees were identified with the same Salmonella type.

A cluster of cases with the same Salmonella type also occurred in Washington, DC and was associated with eating at the Fig & Olive restaurant there from late August through early-September.

This ongoing investigation is being coordinated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with participation by the Food and Drug Administration, and several state and local health departments including Public Health.

From the DC Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Forensic Sciences (DFS):

The DC Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Forensic Sciences (DFS) are in close collaboration, continuing the surveillance, testing and reporting of food samples from the DC Fig and Olive food establishment.  To date, DFS has tested 45 food samples and  15 environmental samples that have yielded negative Salmonella isolates; ten food samples are pending. To date, DFS has confirmed and reported that eleven human specimens, from DC hospitals, have yielded positive results for Salmonella Enteritidis and their DNA typing’s have been shared with the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and have been linked to this outbreak.

Several other states with Fig and Olive restaurants are reporting Salmonella cases.  At this time, the CDC has confirmed that this is now a multiple state investigation tied to Fig and Olive food establishments and is working closely with each jurisdiction to assess the cases, analyze test results and identify possible trends or correlations. All inquiries regarding this national investigation should be directed to the CDC.

As of Wednesday, September 23, 2015, DOH has confirmed 14 cases of salmonella tied back to the DC Fig and Olive establishment. Interviews of those who reported illnesses are ongoing, to date, DOH has interviewed 135 persons.

Three Dead in Arizona, California and Texas from Salmonella Cucumbers

As of September 21, 2015, a total of 558 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona have been reported from 33 states. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Alaska (12), Arizona (95), Arkansas (8), California (120), Colorado (17), Hawaii (1), Idaho (20), Illinois (8), Indiana (2), Iowa (1), Kansas (2), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (4), Minnesota (29), Missouri (9), Montana (14), Nebraska (5), Nevada (11), New Mexico (27), New York (5), North Dakota (3), Ohio (2), Oklahoma (12), Oregon (17), Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina (8), South Dakota (1), Texas (24), Utah (46), Virginia (1), Washington (18), Wisconsin (29), and Wyoming (4).

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from July 3, 2015 to September 11, 2015. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 99, with a median age of 16. Fifty-two percent of ill people are children younger than 18 years. Fifty-four percent of ill people are female. Among 387 people with available information, 112 (29%) report being hospitalized. Three deaths have been reported from Arizona (1), California (1) and Texas (1).

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback investigations have identified cucumbers imported from Mexico and distributed by Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce as a likely source of the infections in this outbreak.

64 with Salmonella at Minnesota Chipotles

tomatoesThe Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) have identified tomatoes as the source of the Salmonella Newport outbreak that has sickened dozens of people who ate at Chipotle restaurants in Minnesota since late August. Investigators are working with state and federal partners to trace the tomatoes back to the farm of origin.

Since the outbreak was reported last week, additional illnesses have been confirmed by MDH.  A total of 64 cases and 22 locations now have been linked to the outbreak [locations are listed below]. Nine people have been hospitalized; all are recovering. Meal dates for the cases range from August 16 to August 28 and people became ill between August 19 and September 3. The cases range in age from 10 to 69 years and are from 13 metro counties and several greater Minnesota counties.

More with Salmonella Linked to Cucumbers

The CDC reports that since the last update on September 9, 2015, 77 new ill people have been reported from Alaska (1), Arizona (6), California (17), Colorado (2), Idaho (6), Indiana (2), Minnesota (8), Montana (3), Nevada (2), New Mexico (4), North Dakota (1), Oklahoma (2), South Carolina (1), Texas (2), Utah (7), Washington (5), Wisconsin (7), and Wyoming (1).As of September 15, 2015, a total of 418 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona have been reported from 31 states. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Alaska (10), Arizona (72), Arkansas (6), California (89), Colorado (16), Hawaii (1), Idaho (14), Illinois (6), Indiana (2), Kansas (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (4), Minnesota (20), Missouri (8), Montana (13), Nebraska (2), Nevada (9), New Mexico (22), New York (4), North Dakota (2), Ohio (2), Oklahoma (10), Oregon (8), Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina (8), Texas (20), Utah (37), Virginia (1), Washington (15), Wisconsin (9), and Wyoming (4).

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from July 3, 2015 to September 3, 2015. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 99, with a median age of 17. Fifty-two percent of ill people are children younger than 18 years. Fifty-three percent of ill people are female. Among 290 people with available information, 91 (31%) report being hospitalized. Two deaths have been reported from California (1) and Texas (1).

sm-map-poona-09-08-2015On September 11, 2015, Custom Produce Sales voluntarily recalled all cucumbers sold under the Fat Boy label starting August 1, 2015 because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. These cucumbers were sent to Custom Produce Sales from Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce. Fat Boy label cucumbers were produced in Baja California, Mexico and distributed in the states of California, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Texas. Unlabeled cucumbers packed into a black reusable plastic container, and sold in Nevada as of August 1, 2015, are also covered by this recall. The type of cucumber is often referred to as a “slicer” or “American” cucumber. It is dark green in color and typical length is 7 to 10 inches. In retail locations it is typically sold in a bulk display without any individual packaging or plastic wrapping. These cucumbers are shipped in a black, green, and red cardboard box which reads “Fat Boy Fresh Produce.” Photos of the packing cartons are available.

Another Salmonella Outbreak in Minnesota

Forty-five (45) cases of Salmonella Newport infection have been reported to the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) since Wednesday, Sept. 2. Since many cases of salmonellosis do not seek health care and get tested, the number of ill people that are part of this outbreak is likely to be larger than the identified number of cases. Consequently, health officials want to bring this outbreak to the attention of people who have become ill with symptoms of salmonellosis but who have not yet consulted a health care provider. These people should mention this outbreak to their health care provider should they consult one.

The investigation to date has found that the 45 cases were all infected withSalmonella Newport bacteria that have matching or very similar DNA fingerprints. Of the 34 people who have been interviewed to date, 32 ate or likely ate at 17 different Chipotle restaurant locations. Most of the restaurant locations are in the Twin Cities metro area, with one in St. Cloud and one in Rochester. Their meal dates range from Aug. 16 to Aug. 26 and they became ill between Aug. 20 and Aug. 29.

The Minnesota cases range in age from 15 to 67 years and are from eight metro and greater Minnesota counties; 56 percent are male. Five cases have been hospitalized; all are recovering.

Investigators from MDH and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture are working on identifying a specific food item source of the outbreak; in the meantime, Chipotle has changed the source of the suspect produce item under investigation. Between Aug. 16 and Aug. 26, Chipotle served more than 560,000 customers in Minnesota and has taken every appropriate measure to ensure that it is safe to eat in its restaurants. Investigators are confident that ongoing transmission at Chipotle as part of this outbreak has ended.

The Chipotle locations involved to date are 7 Corners (Minneapolis), Bloomington, Calhoun, Crystal, Hopkins, Maple Grove, Maplewood, Minnetonka, Richfield, Ridgedale, Rochester, Shoreview, St. Cloud, St. Louis Park, St. Paul Lawson, Uptown, and US Bank Plaza (Minneapolis). However, it is possible that other locations in Minnesota could have been affected as well. At this time there is no indication that locations outside of Minnesota are involved.

2 Dead and Nearly 350 Sick from Salmonella-Tainted Cucumbers

Since the last update on September 4, 2015, 56 new ill people have been reported from Alaska (1), Arizona (6), California (21), Hawaii (1), Illinois (1), Louisiana (1), Missouri (1), New Mexico (3), Oklahoma (3), Oregon (5), Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina (1), Texas (9), and Washington (1).

As of September 8, 2015, a total of 341 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona have been reported from 30 states. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Alaska (9), Arizona (66), Arkansas (6), California (72), Colorado (14), Hawaii (1), Idaho (8), Illinois (6), Kansas (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (4), Minnesota (12), Missouri (8), Montana (10), Nebraska (2), Nevada (7), New Mexico (18), New York (4), North Dakota (1), Ohio (2), Oklahoma (8), Oregon (8), Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina (7), Texas (18), Utah (30), Virginia (1), Washington (10), Wisconsin (2), and Wyoming (3).

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from July 3, 2015 to August 30, 2015. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 99, with a median age of 15. Fifty-three percent of ill people are children younger than 18 years. Fifty-eight percent of ill people are female. Among 214 people with available information, 70 (33%) report being hospitalized. Two deaths have been reported from California (1) and Texas (1).

On September 4, 2015, Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce voluntarily recalled all cucumbers sold under the “Limited Edition” brand label during the period from August 1, 2015 through September 3, 2015 because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The type of cucumber is often referred to as a “slicer” or “American” cucumber and is dark green in color. Typical length is 7 to 10 inches. In retail locations the cucumbers are typically sold in a bulk display without any individual packaging or plastic wrapping.

A photo of the packing carton is available.

No Salmonella Illnesses Linked to Cucumbers in Canada – Yet

Screen-Shot-2015-09-04-at-9.19.00-PM-300x205The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA has announced that Safeway is recalling field cucumbers and various in-store produced products that contain cucumbers purchased from Safeway due to possible Salmonella contamination that were distributed in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Saskatchewan. Consumers should not consume the recalled products described below.

This recall applies to fresh field cucumbers sold in bulk, unwrapped and various in-store produced products that contain cucumbers, such as Greek salad, vegetable trays, sushi and sandwiches purchased from Safeway on or before September 6, 2015. Consumers who are unsure if they have purchased affected products should check with their Safeway store.

  • Field cucumbers (bulk, unwrapped), Purchased from Safeway on or before September 6, 2015, PLU 4062
  • Various in-store produced products that contain cucumbers (Greek salad, vegetable trays, sushi and sandwiches), Purchased from Safeway on or before September 6, 2015

This recall was triggered by a recall by Andrew and Williamson Fresh Produce (“A&W”) of San Diego, California, and may be associated with an outbreak in the United States. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

Currently, the CFIA is not aware of any reported illnesses in Canada associated with the consumption of these products.

Salmonella Cucumbers Sicken in Alaska (8), Arizona (60), Arkansas (6), California (51), Colorado (14), Idaho (8), Illinois (5), Kansas (1), Louisiana (3), Minnesota (12), Missouri (7), Montana (11), Nebraska (2), Nevada (7), New Mexico (15), New York (4), North Dakota (1), Ohio (2), Oklahoma (5), Oregon (3), South Carolina (6), Texas (9), Utah (30), Virginia (1), Washington (9), Wisconsin (2), and Wyoming (3).

Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.19.00 PMAs of September 3, 2015, the CDC reports that 285 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona have been reported from 27 states. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Alaska (8), Arizona (60), Arkansas (6), California (51), Colorado (14), Idaho (8), Illinois (5), Kansas (1), Louisiana (3), Minnesota (12), Missouri (7), Montana (11), Nebraska (2), Nevada (7), New Mexico (15), New York (4), North Dakota (1), Ohio (2), Oklahoma (5), Oregon (3), South Carolina (6), Texas (9), Utah (30), Virginia (1), Washington (9), Wisconsin (2), and Wyoming (3).

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from July 3, 2015 to August 26, 2015. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 99, with a median age of 13. Fifty-four percent of ill people are children younger than 18 years. Fifty-seven percent of ill people are female. Among 160 people with available information, 53 (33%) report being hospitalized. One death has been reported from California.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback investigations have identified imported cucumbers from Mexico and distributed by Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce as a likely source of the infections in this outbreak. The investigation is ongoing.

On September 4, 2015, Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce voluntarily recalled all cucumbers sold under the “Limited Edition” brand label during the period from August 1, 2015 through September 3, 2015 because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. The type of cucumber is often referred to as a “slicer” or “American” cucumber. It is dark green in color and typical length is 7 to 10 inches. In retail locations it is typically sold in a bulk display without any individual packaging or plastic wrapping. Limited Edition cucumbers were distributed in the states of Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah and reached customers through retail, food service companies, wholesalers, and brokers. Further distribution to other states may have occurred. These cucumbers are shipped in a black, green, yellow, and craft colored carton, which reads “Limited Edition Pole Grown Cucumbers.” Labeling on the cases of recalled cucumbers indicates the product was grown and packed by Rancho Don Juanito in Mexico. Domestically produced cucumbers are not believed to be involved in this outbreak.