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Salmonella Blog

Surveillance & Analysis on Salmonella News & Outbreaks

Salmonella Outbreak Ends at Nine

The CDC reported today that a total of nine persons infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg were reported from Tennessee. Two (22%) of nine ill persons were hospitalized, and no deaths were reported. All of the ill persons were incarcerated at a single correctional facility located in Tennessee.

Epidemiologic and traceback investigations conducted by Tennessee and federal officials indicated that consumption of Tyson brand mechanically separated chicken was the source of the outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg infections at the Tennessee correctional facility. On January 10, 2014, Tyson Foods, Inc. recalled approximately 33,840 pounds of mechanically separated chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Heidelberg.

This strain of Salmonella Heidelberg is commonly reported to PulseNet. Twenty-three additional persons infected with this same strain were identified from 15 other states. Investigations determined that these ill persons were not related to the outbreak in Tennessee. Sources of the infections in these 15 states were not identified.

Processed Eggs Recalled

Nutriom LLC, a Lacey, Wash., establishment, is recalling approximately 226,710 pounds of processed egg products that may be contaminated with Salmonella,the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The following products were shipped to co-packers for incorporation into consumer-size packages:

  • 1,383-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Boil-in-Bag Egg Mix, Butter Flavor” with the lot code “C0513-A”
  • 2,540-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the lot code “B1913-A”
  • 2,409-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the lot code “B1913-B”
  • 4,712-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the lot code “E0713-A,B”
  • 1,265-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Boil-in-Bag, Heat and Serve” with the lot code “F1813-A”
  • 4,155-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the lot code “I1113-A”
  • 6,132-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg, Cage Free” with the lot code “J2913-A”
  • 9,345-lb. super sack of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg, Cage Free” with the lot code “A1414-A”

The following products were packaged in consumer-sized packages:

  • 3.06-lb. bags of “OvaEasy Boil-in-Bag Egg Mix, Butter Flavor” with the Julian dates “3074” and “3075”
  • 2.34-lb. bags of “OvaEasy Boil-in-Bag, Reduced Cholesterol” with the Julian dates “3122,” “3123,” “3124,” “3127,” “3128” and “3129”
  • 4.5-oz. cans of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian date “2903,” “1343” and “2893”
  • 4-oz. bags of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian dates “0853” and “0863”
  • 4.5-oz. bags of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian dates “0853,” “0863” and “0873”
  • 1.75-lb. packs of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian dates “0813,” “1083,”  “1093,” “1433,” “1443,” “1573,” “1723,” “2063,” “2163,” “2173,” “2183” “2243,” “2253,” “2183,” “2533,” “2543,” “2553,” “2563,” “2673,” “2683,” “2693” and “2703”
  • 3.2-oz. bags of “Wise Company, Wise Blend” with the Julian dates “0953” and “0993”
  • 2-oz. packs of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian dates “2073,” “2063,” “2163,” “2603,” “2613” “2903,” “2913,” “2953,” “2963,” “3173” and “3183”
  • 3.2-oz. packs of “Wise Company, Wise Blend” with the Julian dates “1133,” “1143,” “1153,” “1163” and “1353”
  • 1.17-lb. bags of “OvaEasy UGRA Boil-in-Bag, Reduced Cholesterol” with the Julian dates “3129,” “3130” and “3137”
  • 1.75-lb. packs of “OvaEasy” with the Julian dates “2163,” “2173,” “2183” and “2243”
  • 4.5-oz. packs of “OvaEasy Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian dates “2563,” “2623” and “2633”
  • 1.1-lb. packs of “OvaEasy UGR H&S” with the Julian dates “3173,” “3174,” “3175,” “3177,” “3178,” “3179,” “3180,” “3181,” “3182,” “3183,” “3194,” “3195,” “3196,” “3197,” “3198” and “3199”
  • 1.1-lb. packs of “G0213-A UGR H&S” with the Julian dates “3186,” “3187,” “3189,” “3190” and “3191”
  • 128-gram packs of “Egg Crystal, Sea Salt and Pepper” with the Julian date “3033”
  • 128-gram packs of “Egg Crystal, Sausage and Herb” with the Julian date “3043”
  • 1.17-lb. packs of “OvaEasy UGR-A Reduced Cholesterol” with the Julian dates “3141,” “3142,” “3148,” “3149” and “3150”
  • 3-oz. packs of “eFoods Plain Whole Egg” with the Julian dates of “3173” and “3183”

The dried egg products were produced between Feb. 28, 2013, and Feb. 8, 2014, and bear the establishment number “INSPECTED EGG PRODUCTS PLANT 21493G” inside the USDA Mark of Inspection. These products were shipped nationwide and to U.S. military installations in the United States and abroad, as well as to Canada.

Curly Parsley Recalled Due to Salmonella Risk

ROTH FARMS Inc. of Belle Glade, Fl , is recalling its “ bunched Curly Parsley” because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The recalled “Curly Parsley” was distributed in South Florida distribution centers.

The product comes in a 3 Wire Wooden Crate with the lot # AG01GN on the outside tag.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by the company revealed the presence of Salmonella in some Curly Parsley samples.”

Production of the product has been suspended while FDA and the company continue their investigation as to the source of the problem.

Tomatoes Recalled in Florida, North Carolina, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Tennessee

Big Red Tomato Packers, LLC of Fort Pierce, FL is voluntarily issuing a limited recall of 790 – 20 and 25 lb. boxes of fresh tomatoes of lot 1106, because they may have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting or abdominal pain.

This is a voluntary precautionary recall as there are no known illnesses associated with this lot number.

Tomatoes from the lot were distributed to a limited number of receivers in Florida, North Carolina, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. All receivers of the lot have been notified.

Pet Food Recalled Due to Salmonella Risk

Pro-Pet LLC, St. Marys, Ohio, has initiated a voluntary recall of a limited number of Dry Dog and Cat Foods for possible Salmonella contamination. A single field test indicated products manufactured during a two day period, on a single production line may have the potential for Salmonella contamination. Pro-Pet LLC is voluntarily recalling the potentially impacted products made during this timeframe. There have been no reports of illness related to this product to date.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Product Best By Lot Code UPC Number

40 lb Hubbard Life Happy Hound Dog Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 2A 1219033878

40 lb Hubbard Life Happy Hound Dog Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 1219033878

18 lb Hubbard Life Cat Stars Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 1219033873

40 lb Hubbard Life Maintenance Dog Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 2A 1219033875

15 lb Joy Combo Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 7065407721

40 lb Joy Combo Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 7065407713

40 lb Joy Combo Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 2A 7065407713

20 lb QC Plus Adult Dog Food 05 07 14 097 13 SM L2 2A 2351780103

40 lb QC Plus Adult Dog Food 05 07 14 097 13 SM L2 2A 2351780104

40 lb QC Plus Adult Dog Food 05 07 14 097 13 SM L2 1A 2351780104

These products were distributed through select retailers, distributors and on-line consumer purchases in Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia

50 Sickened by White Bean Salmonella in Alabama

A nine-page study issued by the Alabama Department of Public Health and obtained Friday by The News Courier reveals that uncooked beans for the annual fundraiser had been soaked in a plastic-lined horse trough covered with plywood before the event and that existing bean soup was topped off with new bean soup during the event.  Those are just some of the possible ways the beans became contaminated with Salmonella senftenberg, according to the report.

An estimated 250 to 300 people ate food prepared for the Oct. 4 dinner hosted by the Athens-Limestone Foundation for Aging and held at First Baptist Church Family Life Center in Athens. The menu included white beans with ham, onions, vinegar-based coleslaw, cornbread, soft drinks and a variety of homemade desserts.  About 50 people reported falling ill following the event, though some may never have reported their illness.

Salmonella senftenberg was isolated “in two environmental samples obtained from the church, nine food samples and all stool specimens,” according to the report. “The two positive environmental samples were from environment swabs of a dirty strainer and the double sink floor drain at the church.”

Jean Cole of the News Courier reported today: “Health Dept.:  Beans soaked in horse trough – Dozens taken ill after annual event.”

California’s The Cultured Kitchen Salmonella Update

The CDC reports a total of 17 persons infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Stanleywere reported from three states.  Most of the ill people were reported from California (88%). The number of ill persons identified in each state was as follows: California (15), Nevada (1), and Wyoming (1).  20% of ill persons were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

Collaborative investigative efforts of state, local, and federal public health and regulatory agencies indicated that raw cashew cheese produced by The Cultured Kitchen of West Sacramento, California was the source of this outbreak.  Cashew cheese is a non-dairy product made from raw cashews and other ingredients.  On December 31, 2013, The Cultured Kitchen voluntarily recalled its raw cashew cheese due to a risk of contamination with Salmonella.

The recall affected all six varieties of raw cashew cheese produced by The Cultured Kitchen with an expiration date of April 19, 2014 or earlier.  Photos of the recalled products are available  [PDF - 888 KB].

Small Possible Salmonella Outbreak in Oregon

Two Oregonians have tested positive for a rare strain of Salmonella known as Salmonella overschie, according to the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division.

The first patient was a 28-year-old Coos County woman who fell ill in December. The second case was a minor in Lane County, which is separated from Coos County by Douglas County.

The two patients developed their symptoms eight days apart. The state health department investigated the possible source of contamination, but couldn’t determine one before ending the investigation.

Authorities say the strain has never before been reported in Oregon. Only 23 cases of Salmonella overschie were detected in the U.S. between 1995 and 2005, according to health officials.

No new cases have surfaced since December.

Salmonella overschie has been known of since at least 1961, when it was isolated from a patient in the Netherlands.

Report out on Michigan Pints & Quarts Pub and Grill and C.F. Prime Chophouse and Wine Bar Salmonella Outbreak

Michelle Anderson with mlive.com reports that the final report on the Salmonella outbreak that affected at least 32 residents in Muskegon and Ottawa counties last year was published last week.

The 68-page document (attached) released by Public Health-Muskegon County formed nine hypotheses and suggested raw eggs, cross contamination or poor food handling were likely the cause of the outbreak that affected patrons and employees at Pints & Quarts Pub and Grill and C.F. Prime Chophouse and Wine Bar between Oct. 30 and Nov. 2.

Investigators said the restaurants’ salads — including those with grilled chicken — and Pints & Quarts’ Thai Chicken Lettuce Wraps appetizer were strongly associated with the illness.   The final report noted that raw eggs were used in the restaurants’ original Caesar and Citrus salad dressings and its béarnaise sauce, a classic French condiment made with butter and spices.

The report’s conclusion found that it was unlikely that Salmonella with the same DNA fingerprint came in “from various farms or processors” and said it was more likely that contamination happened in the facility and at the pantry station.

Salmonella Outbreak Linked to ARO Pistachios

Year old Salmonella outbreak announcement slipped into FDA Warning Letter

According to a recently released FDA Warning Letter, in early 2013 ARO was associated with three Reportable Food Registry (RFR) reports that detailed positive Salmonella findings detected in two shipments of raw pistachios.  In addition, according to the letter, a cluster of salmonellosis infections reported from January through May 2013, were investigated by local, state, and federal public health and regulatory agencies. Epidemiological data from the outbreak investigation coupled with results of FDA inspection findings and analyses from product and environmental samples collected from ARO’s processing facility indicate that pistachios were the likely source of the Salmonella outbreak.

During the May 21st through May 24th, 2013 inspection, environmental samples were collected from various locations within ARO’s processing facility and analyzed. The analysis revealed the presence of Salmonella enterica serotype Senftenberg (S. senftenberg) in seventeen (17) subsamples.

During the FDA inspection, investigators observed the following significant violation:

a.         An employee in the roasting room was observed repeatedly touching the bottom of shipping boxes that were resting on the floor and then touching roasted, ready-to-eat, pistachios without washing or sanitizing hands.

b.         Maintenance personnel were observed entering and exiting the hand sorting room through a door that opens directly to the outside of the facility. Apparent bird droppings were observed on the floor of the outside areas where maintenance personnel were observed working and entering the hand sorting room.

c.         Inside the hand sorting room, two buckets containing floor sweepings of pistachios, dust, and debris, were observed near the hand sorting production lines. During the inspection, ARO stated that the buckets of floor swept pistachios would be reworked into finished product.

d.         The movement of employees from the outside of the facility (where apparent bird droppings were observed) into the hand sorting room may introduce contaminants into the facility and contaminate finished food, particularly based on the practice of reworking pistachios from the floor.