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Salmonella Blog

Surveillance & Analysis on Salmonella News & Outbreaks

Morimoto Restaurant Tied to Salmonella Outbreak

Napa Valley Register reports several people reported getting sick with Salmonella after eating at Morimoto Napa last month, according to Napa County Public Health.

There are at least six confirmed cases of salmonella-related food borne illnesses in customers who dined at the restaurant on Main Street between Oct. 10 and Oct. 12, said Dr. Karen Relucio, the county’s chief public health officer.

Relucio confirmed that the restaurant has been cooperative. During their investigation, she said, officials found that the restaurant was very clean and organized with strict operating procedures. Although the source of the salmonella outbreak is still under investigation, Relucio said that the department didn’t see any risk of ongoing transmission associated with eating at Morimoto Napa.

Salmonella, a type of bacteria that causes food poisoning, can be found in a variety of different food products, including chicken, beef, pork, eggs, tomatoes and spouts. Eating raw or undercooked food increases the risk of getting sick, Relucio said. The symptoms usually appear between 12 and 72 hours after infection and include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps.

The illness lasts between four and seven days, Relucio said, and most people recover without treatment. Still, she said, if someone gets sick with food poisoning after eating out, they should report it to either Public Health or Environmental Health.

Salmonella Tainted Cucumbers Pulled from Schools and Hospitals in California

logo-Prime-Time-ProducePrime Time Produce has issued a voluntary product recall for certain lots of cucumbers delivered to multiple locations in Bakersfield due to potential salmonella contamination.

These cucumbers may have been served in salad bars at the following schools between October 19, 2016 through October 28, 2016:

Bakersfield City Schools Greenfield Union School District
Cato Middle School Granite Point Elementary
Chavez Elementary Greenfield Jr. High
College Heights Elementary Horizon Elementary
Eissler Elementary McKee Middle
Fletcher Elementary Ollivier Jr. High
Garza Elementary Palla Elementary
Harding Elementary Planz Elementary
Harris Elementary
Horace Mann Elementary
Jefferson Elementary
Longfellow Elementary
Munsey Elementary
Nichols Elementary
Noble Elementary
Pioneer Elementary
Roosevelt Elementary
Thorner Elementary
Voorhies Elementary
William Penn Elementary

Other locations that may have received these cucumbers are as follows:

San Joaquin Community Hospital
Bakersfield Memorial Hospital
Bakersfield Heart Hospital
California State University, Bakersfield
Logan’s Roadhouse
BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse

Salmonella may cause diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection. Salmonella infection can last 4 to 7 days, and most individuals recover without treatment. There have been no reports of illness due to consumption of this product in Kern County. Anyone concerned about illness should contact their healthcare provider.

Kern County Public Health will continue to monitor this voluntary recall and keep our community updated on any new information.

Hawaiian Seaweed Tied to Salmonella Outbreak

More than two dozen people in Hawaii have been infected by Salmonella bacteria in an outbreak that is tentatively linked to seaweed (limu or ogo) from an unnamed farm on Oahu. The 14 infected people include children and adults, with four victims have such severe symptoms that they required hospitalization, according to the Hawaii Department of Health. Although encouraging public awareness, the state health department did not release the name of the Oahu farm. The department ordered the farm “to halt operations and advise its customers to remove product from sale immediately.” All of the infected people developed diarrheal illnesses from mid- to late October. Preliminary investigations identified consumption of raw fish, specifically poke that contained limu, as a common factor among the sick people.

Costco Recalls Chicken Salad Due to Salmonella

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert out of an abundance of caution due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with a chicken salad product sold from Costco Store #1190, in Lynwood, Wash.

pha-100916The chicken salad item for this public health alert was produced Aug. 26 through Sept. 2, 2016. The following product is subject to the public health alert:

  • Varying weights of “Costco Rotisserie Chicken Salad”.

This product was sold directly to consumers who shopped at Costco Store #1190 in Lynwood, Wash.

On September 26, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- illnesses in the state of Washington. Working in conjunction with CDC and the Washington State Department of Health, FSIS determined that there is a possible link between rotisserie chicken salad from Costco’s Alderwood store in Lynwood, Wash. and these illnesses. Based on epidemiological evidence, four Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- case-patients have been identified with illness onset dates ranging from September 2 to September 6, 2016. Traceback investigation indicated that three of these case-patients consumed rotisserie chicken salad purchased on August 26, August 31 and September 2, 2016 from this Costco location. No product has tested positive for this strain of Salmonella. Clinical isolates associated with this investigation were tested for antibiotic-resistance, and three isolates from Washington State were found resistant only to tetracycline and susceptible to other antibiotics commonly used to treat salmonellosis. FSIS continues to work with Costco and public health partners on this investigation, and will provide more information as it becomes available.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased this product on August 26, August 31 and September 2, 2016 are urged not to consume it.

Micro Greens Recalled after Salmonella Test

Osage Gardens Inc. is recalling Osage Gardens Organic 2oz Micro Greens, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Osage Gardens Organic 2oz Micro Greens was distributed to Whole Foods stores in Colorado and Kansas. The Osage Gardens Organic 2oz Micro Greens product is packed in a clear plastic clamshell and has a label on the bottom with a UPC Code 709376615008 and affected product are dated with a Julian codes from 266 to 279’.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was a result of a routine sampling by the FDA which revealed that the finished products contained the bacteria. Osage Gardens Inc. has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and Osage Gardens Inc. continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

Good Earth has Bad Eggs

CDC is working with public health and regulatory officials in Missouri, several other states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Oranienburg infections.

Eight people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from three states. A list of states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from April 23, 2016 to August 24, 2016. Ill people range in age from 1 year to 85, with a median age of 44. Sixty-three percent of ill people are female. Among seven people with available information, two (29%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

WGS showed that isolates from ill people are closely related genetically to one another. This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.

The strain of Salmonella Oranienburg in this outbreak also is closely related genetically to a Salmonella Oranienburg strain from a 2015 outbreak linked to the Good Earth Egg Company. In the 2015 outbreak, 52 people infected with the outbreak strain were reported from six states. In response to the 2015 outbreak, Good Earth Egg Company recalled all of its shell eggs on January 9, 2016.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback investigations identified shell eggs distributed by Good Earth Egg Company of Bonne Terre, Missouri as the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of the six ill people who were interviewed, all six (100%) reported eating or possibly eating shell eggs in the week before illness started. Ill people reported eating eggs in restaurants as well as at home.

Federal, state, and local health and regulatory officials performed a traceback investigation from one restaurant location in Missouri where three ill people reported eating eggs. This investigation indicated that Good Earth Egg Company supplied eggs to that restaurant.

Missouri health officials collected and tested shell eggs from the Missouri restaurant location and isolated the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg. Additionally, environmental samples taken at the Good Earth Egg Company processing facility isolated the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg. WGS showed that the isolates of Salmonella Oranienburg from eggs distributed by Good Earth Egg Company are closely related genetically to isolates from ill people in this outbreak and from ill people and environmental samples in the 2015 outbreak. This close genetic relationship provides additional evidence that ill people in this outbreak and in the 2015 outbreak got sick from eating shell eggs distributed by Good Earth Egg Company of Bonne Terre, Missouri.

CDC recommends that consumers do not eat and restaurants and retailers do not serve or sell shell eggs distributed by Good Earth Egg Company at this time. Eggs distributed by Good Earth Egg Company were sold under different brand names. If you don’t know if your eggs were distributed by Good Earth Egg Company, ask the store where you bought them or the restaurant where they were served.

This investigation is ongoing, and we will update the public when more information becomes available. CDC and state and local public health partners are continuing laboratory surveillance through PulseNet to identify additional ill people and to interview those people about foods they ate before they got sick.

Marler Clark Retained in Chapel Hill Creamery Salmonella Outbreak

The Chapel Hill Creamery in Chapel Hill, NC, is recalling all of its cheese products because they have been linked to a growing Salmonella outbreak in North Carolina and elsewhere.

A local county health officer said Thursday that the outbreak has sickened at least 50 people in North Carolina and about the same number in other states, and that it’s the same strain found in samples of raw milk from the Chapel Hill Creamery. Nine of those sickened in North Carolina have been hospitalized so far.

The products being recalled include all codes, packages and sizes of 14 varieties of cheese manufactured by the Chapel Hill Creamery and distributed through retail locations, farmers markets and restaurants throughout North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia.

The cheese varieties are: Quark, Danziger, Swiss, Paneer, Calvander, Hot Farmers Cheese, Dairyland Farmers Cheese, Smoked Mozzarella, Fresh Mozzarella, Burrata, Hickory Grove, Carolina Moon, Smoked Farmers Cheese, New Moon, and Pheta.

Salmonella Outbreak in King, Kitsap, Pierce, Spokane and other Counties

Last month, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department learned of a foodborne illness outbreak in Snohomish County associated with food supplied by a Pierce County caterer, Mr. Rick’s Catering. The state Department of Health continues to investigate the outbreak, which could impact as many as 175 people in King, Kitsap, Pierce, Spokane, and other counties. While the effort to learn how many people were sickened is still underway, laboratory tests have confirmed the illness is Salmonella.

Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department has notified Mr. Rick’s Catering not to operate several times since 2012, and as a result of the incident in Snohomish County, recently issued a $710 fee for continuing to operate without a permit. In the interest of protecting public health, and because the business owner continues to advertise as a viable business, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department has opted to name the unpermitted caterer.

“Public health focuses on keeping people safe in places where they live, learn, work and play,” said Jefferson Ketchel, environmental health director for the Snohomish Health District. “Public health partners around the region work together to advance food safety and give residents information they need to make informed decisions when eating out.”

Sprout Salmonella Outbreak in Colorado, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Texas and Wyoming

Thirty people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from nine states – Colorado 13, Kansas 8, Minnesota 1, Missouri 1, Nebraska 2, New York 1, Oregon 1, Texas 1 and Wyoming 2.

Of those ill people, 24 were infected with Salmonella Reading, 1 was infected with Salmonella Abony, and 5 were infected with both.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 21, 2016 to July 20, 2016. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 72, with a median age of 30. Fifty-three percent of ill people are female. Five ill people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence available at this time indicate that alfalfa sprouts supplied by Sprouts Extraordinaire of Denver, Colorado are the likely source of this outbreak. Ill people in the current outbreak reported eating raw alfalfa sprouts on sandwiches from several different restaurants.

Federal, state, and local health and regulatory officials performed a traceback investigation from five restaurants where ill people reported eating alfalfa sprouts. This investigation indicated that Sprouts Extraordinaire supplied alfalfa sprouts to all five of these locations.

On August 5, 2016, Sprouts Extraordinaire recalled its alfalfa sprout products from the market due to possible Salmonella contamination. These products were sold in 5-pound boxes labeled “Living Alfalfa Sprouts.” CDC recommends that restaurants and other retailers do not sell or serve and consumers do not eat recalled alfalfa sprouts supplied by Sprouts Extraordinaire.

According the FDA’s own 1999 advisory, Recommendations on Sprouted Seeds, sprouts have been increasingly implicated in foodborne outbreaks.  Perhaps it is time for a sprout warning?

Barfblog does a great job of tracking sprout outbreak through 2012.  Outbreak Database carries on – through 2014.

Chapel Hill Creamery Salmonella Outbreak may impact over 100

The Chapel Hill Creamery in Chapel Hill, NC, is recalling all of its cheese products because they have been linked to a growing Salmonella outbreak in North Carolina and elsewhere.

A local county health officer said Thursday that the outbreak has sickened at least 50 people in North Carolina and about the same number in other states, and that it’s the same strain found in samples of raw milk from the Chapel Hill Creamery. Nine of those sickened in North Carolina have been hospitalized so far, she said.

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-jersey-cows-farm-field-image819287
These Jersey cows are the same kind as those at the Chapel Hill Creamery.
“This is way more than usual, which is why we started doing the investigation. We hit clusters of Salmonella, especially in the summertime, but we started seeing dozens and that’s when we started doing questionnaires to identify a common source,” said Colleen Bridger, director of the Orange County Health Department in Chapel Hill.

Bridger said not all of the 50-plus in-state cases have been interviewed, but the “vast majority” of those who have recalled eating cheese from the Chapel Hill Creamery.

“We’ve been monitoring the Salmonella cases for about three weeks and started doing questionnaires about a week ago, and it was just yesterday that we felt we had enough information to say this is probably the Chapel Hill Creamery. We didn’t want to make the declaration until we were sure,” she added.

The products being recalled include all codes, packages and sizes of 14 varieties of cheese manufactured by the Chapel Hill Creamery and distributed through retail locations, farmers markets and restaurants throughout North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Virginia and Georgia.

The cheese varieties are: Quark, Danziger, Swiss, Paneer, Calvander, Hot Farmers Cheese, Dairyland Farmers Cheese, Smoked Mozzarella, Fresh Mozzarella, Burrata, Hickory Grove, Carolina Moon, Smoked Farmers Cheese, New Moon, and Pheta.

“Although there is not yet a definitive link between the CHC cheese and the illnesses, there is enough evidence to implicate the cheese and we are asking customers to not consume these cheeses or use them in food service,” said Portia McKnight, Creamery co-founder.

Chapel Hill Creamery has asked its wholesale customers to remove any CHC cheese from their shelves and dispose of it. Consumers who have this product in their home should not consume it and should throw it away.

Customers are also being reminded to thoroughly wash their hands and any utensils or equipment that may have contacted the cheese in warm, soapy water.

Chapel Hill Creamery is working in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, and the Orange County Health Department to identify the source of the Salmonella and which of its cheeses are affected.

The Creamery plans to provide updated information on its website as it becomes available.

Chapel Hill Creamery cheeseBridger noted that some of the Creamery’s cheese products are made with raw milk and some are not. She also said it was the first such incident she knows of involving the local business.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is aware of the outbreak and has been assisting the other states, Bridger said, while North Carolina state and local health officials are coordinating on their part of the investigation.

“We’re working with public health and with agriculture to try and figure out what the next step is to make sure we’ve resolved the problem and that they can resume production and selling their cheese again,” she said.

Orange County has provided a hotline at (919) 245-2378 for anyone in North Carolina who has questions about the outbreak.

Most persons infected with Salmonella experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. People who are concerned they might have Salmonella infections should contact their doctor to discuss testing and treatment.

The illness typically lasts four to seven days, and most people recover without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.