28 sick – Confirmed Case Definition:

Persons with Salmonella Typhimurium (confirmed or visual match to Pattern JPXX01.0275) with illness onset since January 1, 2018 reporting consumption of chicken salad from Fareway (any store) in the 7 days prior to illness onset.

66 sick – Probable Case Definition:

Persons that are epi linked to a confirmed case (all confirmed cases are laboratory confirmed), OR Persons who test positive by CIDT or culture (with serotype and PFGE pending) with illness onset since January 1, 2018 reporting consumption of chicken salad from Fareway (any store) in the 7 days prior to illness onset.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert out of an abundance of caution due to concerns about illnesses reported in the state of Iowa that may be caused by Salmonella associated with a chicken salad product. This product was sold at all Fareway grocery stores in Iowa, as well as Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota.

Minnesota has one case associated with this outbreak so far, in a Martin County resident.

The chicken salad item for this public health alert was produced between Dec. 15, 2017 and Feb. 13, 2018. The following product is subject to the public health alert:

  • Varying weights of “Fareway Chicken Salad” sold in plastic deli containers with a Fareway store deli label.

This product was shipped to all Fareway grocery stores in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota and sold directly to consumers who shopped at Fareway.  The problem was discovered following reports of illness in Iowa.

On Feb. 9, 2018, the Iowa Department of Public Health notified FSIS of an investigation of Salmonella related illnesses, within the state of Iowa.  FSIS continues to work with public health partners at the Iowa Department of Public Health and Department of Inspections and Appeals on this investigation. Updated information will be provided as it becomes available.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals (DIA) today jointly issued a consumer advisory for chicken salad sold at Fareway stores. The chicken salad, which is produced and packaged by a third party for Fareway, is implicated in multiple cases of salmonella illness across Iowa. Preliminary test results from the State Hygienic Laboratory (SHL) at the University of Iowa indicate the presence of salmonella in this product.

Fareway voluntarily stopped the sale of the product and pulled the chicken salad from its shelves after being contacted by DIA. “The company has been very cooperative and is working with IDPH and DIA in the investigation of the reported illnesses,” said DIA Food and Consumer Safety Bureau Chief Steven Mandernach, who noted that no chicken salad has been sold to the consuming public since last Friday evening (2/9/18).

IDPH is investigating multiple cases of possible illness associated with the chicken salad. “The bottom line is that no one should eat this product,” said IDPH Medical Director, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk. “If you have it in your refrigerator, you should throw it away.”

The woman is identified at Denise Castaneda of Westminster according to the Adams County coroner.

We talked with her mother who says they ordered take-out carnitas at La California. Soon after Denise started throwing up. Her mother says Denise was hospitalized, had surgery and then she died. “I`m pretty upset. She died not knowing what she had. I didn`t expect her to die before me. I didn`t get as sick,” Denise’s mother told us.

FOX31 first brought you the story Thursday of 33 people who were sickened after they ate at La California restaurant in Aurora in November 2017. The Tri-County Health Department said the salmonella outbreak killed one person and three others were hospitalized. La California is at East 17th Avenue and Peoria Street.

The health department said lab tests show the family combination meal might have led to the poisoning. The meal includes ingredients such as meat, beans and cilantro.

But investigators could not pinpoint what started the outbreak.

The health department said the outbreak affected people who ate at La California from Nov. 4-26. Almost all of the people infected experienced diarrhea and abdominal cramping.

La California earned an “F” in the Restaurant Report Card for 30 critical violations in its March 2015 health inspection.

Minnesota health officials say two children in the Twin Cities area got sick from salmonella poisoning after coming in contact with tainted pet food.

The Minnesota Department of Health said Friday that testing found the same salmonella DNA patterns in the siblings. One of the children was hospitalized last month with a painful bone condition.

An investigation found the children’s home contained Raws for Paws Ground Turkey Food, and that the pet food was contaminated.

The contaminated raw turkey pet food was produced on Oct. 12 and sold online on the Raws for Paws website. The product was recalled Monday by the manufacturer.

Health officials are urging pet owners to discard or return pet food with this brand, and to thoroughly clean bowls or surface areas.

Fox 31 News reports that the Tri-County Health Department has confirmed to FOX31’s Erika Gonzalez that one person has died from Salmonella poisoning related to eating at a restaurant in Aurora.

The health department tells FOX31 that 33 people were sickened by eating at La California restaurant on Peoria Street in November 2017. One person died from issues related to salmonella.

The health department says lab tests show the family combo meal may have led to the poisoning.

The health department says the outbreak affected people who ate at La California from November 4 to November 26, 2017.

La California is at 1685 Peoria Street in Aurora.

The health department’s report says 13 of the 33 cases are confirmed, and 20 of the cases are probable for Salmonella. The illnesses involved 32 restaurant patrons and one employee.

Twenty-five cases had exposures at the restaurant with their meals with a 5-day period from November 10 to November 14, 2017.

La California earned an ‘F’ in FOX31’s Restaurant Report Card two years ago for 30 critical violations in its March 2015 health inspection.

At least 37 babies in France are known to have fallen ill with Salmonella Agona.  There is reported another illness in Spain, while Greece has also seen one unconfirmed case.

Of the babies taken ill in France, 18 were hospitalized. All are now recovering, according to the public health agency.

Hundreds of lawsuits have already been filed against Lactalis by families who say their children got Salmonella poisoning after drinking powdered milk made by the company.

The French government has laid the blame for the widening crisis squarely on both Lactalis, one of the world’s largest dairy groups, and on retailers who sold the tainted products despite a recall.

Anger has been growing since it emerged that Lactalis’s own tests had discovered salmonella at the Craon site in August and November, but did not report the findings because it had no legal obligation to do so.

Lactalis has recalled more than 12 million packages of Picot, Milumel, Celia and other brands of powdered baby milk from 83 countries.

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and other state and local health departments, is investigating a recent cluster of Salmonella ser. Montevideo infections.  Two cases have been identified in Illinois residents.  People in Illinois reported becoming ill on December 20 and 26, 2017.  Based on a review of produce, suppliers, and items consumed, investigators believe the most likely source of the infection is sprouts from multiple Jimmy John’s locations.

To reduce the risk to additional customers, IDPH has requested that all Jimmy John’s restaurants in Illinois remove sprouts from their menus until the investigation is complete.  IDPH is also reminding restaurants not to let food handlers with diarrhea work.  If you have developed symptoms of Salmonella infection after eating food at a Jimmy John’s restaurant please contact your health care provider or local health department.

Symptoms of Salmonella may include headache, muscle aches, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, chills, fever, nausea, and dehydration.  Symptoms usually appear 6 to 72 hours after ingesting the bacteria, but can be longer.  Most illnesses resolve on their own and do not require treatment other than drinking fluids to stay hydrated.  If your symptoms persist or are severe, promptly contact your health care provider.

Salmonella bacteria live in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals.  Almost any food can be contaminated with Salmonella.  Person-to-person transmission of Salmonella occurs when an infected person’s feces, from his or her unwashed hands, contaminates food during preparation, or comes into direct contact with another person.

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.

As of January 12, 2018, 25 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- (24 people) or Salmonella Newport (1 person) have been reported from 9 states – California, Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Washington. One more ill person infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- has been reported from Canada.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 11, 2017 to November 4, 2017. Ill people range in age from 1 year to 82, with a median age of 19. Among ill people, 19 (76%) are male. Six people (24%) report being hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut is the likely source of this multistate outbreak. This investigation is ongoing.

Throughout the outbreak investigation, state and local health officials have collected different food items from restaurants where ill people consumed Asian-style dessert drinks. In November 2017, laboratory testing of a sample from coconut milk made in one restaurant in New York did not identify the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:-, but did identify a strain of Salmonella Newport. This sample was from coconut milk made with Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut, as well as other ingredients. WGS showed that the Salmonella Newport isolated from the coconut milk was closely related genetically to a Salmonella Newport isolate from an ill person from Massachusetts who had consumed an Asian-style dessert drink.

In December 2017, officials in Massachusetts collected food items from a restaurant where that ill person had consumed Asian-style dessert drinks. One sample from frozen shredded coconut identified a strain of Salmonella that was new to the PulseNet database and has not been linked to any illnesses. This sample was from an unopened package of Coconut Tree Brand Frozen Shredded Coconut. As a result, on January 3, 2018, Evershing International Trading Company recalled all Coconut Tree Brand Frozen Shredded Coconut. The recalled product was packaged in 16-ounce plastic bags.

Officials in Massachusetts returned to the restaurant and collected more Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut in January 2018. On January 12, laboratory testing confirmed that samples from that frozen shredded coconut identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:-. Laboratory testing of other samples identified several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Javiana, Salmonella Rissen, and Salmonella Thompson. These samples were from unopened packages of Coconut Tree Brand Frozen Shredded Coconut sold before January 3, 2018. CDC is reviewing the PulseNet database to determine if the other Salmonella isolates from the frozen shredded coconut are linked to any illnesses.

The frozen shredded coconut linked to this outbreak was used as an ingredient in Asian-style dessert drinks served at restaurants. The product was also sold in grocery stores and markets in several states. Frozen shredded coconut can last for several months if kept frozen and may still be in retail stores or in people’s homes. CDC recommends that retailers not sell, restaurants not serve, and consumers not eat recalled Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut.

Eggnog from a Tiverton dairy is being recalled, the state health department said Tuesday. Arruda’s Dairy Farms is recalling its pint, quart, and half-gallon containers of egg nog, due to possible contamination from Salmonella bacteria. The sell dates are Feb. 3 and 1o, 2018.

No one became ill, the health department said, but the problem was discovered during routine product sampling.

“The recalled packages were distributed to home delivery customers and throughout eastern Rhode Island and the Fall River area of Massachusetts through retail stores,” the health department said.

Here is the information from the press release.

The production of the product has been suspended while RIDOH and the company continue to investigate the source of the problem. Arruda’s has cooperated fully with RIDOH during the investigation.

salmonella

In Minnesota, the Bemidji Pioneer reported two Burger King restaurants in Bemidji temporarily closed Thursday after more than two dozen people contracted salmonella after eating there.  Doug Schultz, a spokesperson with the Minnesota Department of Health, said the department has confirmed 27 cases, and received reports of four more probable cases.

Both Burger King sites voluntarily decided to close Thursday. Most cases were identified in September, he said, but the victims may have been exposed to salmonella before then. Two additional cases came to light this week, prompting the closures.

The Washington State Department of Health announced today a Salmonella outbreak involving pre-cut watermelon, cantaloupe, or fruit mixes containing watermelon or cantaloupe in both Washington and Oregon.

People who purchased these products on or about Oct. 25 up to Dec. 1 from QFC, Fred Meyer, Rosauers, and Central Market in Washington and Oregon are urged not to eat the fruit and throw it away.

Eighteen people from King (5), Mason (1), Pierce (1), Snohomish (7), Thurston (1), and Yakima (1) counties and two individuals from Oregon have been diagnosed with Salmonella.

Lab results identified Salmonella Newport as the cause.