Header graphic for print

Salmonella Blog

Surveillance & Analysis on Salmonella News & Outbreaks

50 Sick with Salmonella in Washington from Pork

pork-chopsWashington State health officials are working with state and local partners to investigate several cases and clusters of Salmonella infections that appear to be linked to eating pork. The ongoing investigation of at least 56 cases in eight counties around the state includes food served at a variety of events.

Disease investigators continue to explore several sources from farm to table, and are focused on an apparent link to pork consumption or contamination from raw pork. Salmonellosis, the illness caused by infection with Salmonella, can cause severe and even bloody diarrhea, fever, chills, abdominal discomfort, and vomiting. Serious bloodstream infections may also occur.

As of July 23, the 56 cases include residents of King (44), Snohomish (4), Mason (2), Thurston (2), Pierce (1), Grays Harbor (1), Yakima (1), and Clark (1) counties. Five of the cases were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. All were infected with the same strain of Salmonella bacteria. The disease investigation shows a potential exposure source for several cases was whole roasted pigs, cooked and served at private events. The source of contamination remains under investigation by state and local health officials and federal partners.

The outbreaks are a reminder of the importance of proper food care, handling, preparation, and cooking to prevent illness. State health officials recommend these food safety strategies broadly, and specifically advise against eating raw or undercooked pork.

Following food safety guidance can help prevent food-borne illness. Health officials warn consumers who handle and/or eat pork to cook the meat to a safe internal temperature, using a meat thermometer; whole cuts of pork should be cooked to 145 degrees. Meat thermometers should be placed in the thickest part of the meat, avoiding bone, fat, and cartilage.

All meats and fish should be cooked to a safe internal temperature, using a food thermometer; guidance can be found on the Department of Health website. Other food safety tips include washing hands thoroughly with soap and water before and after preparing food, especially raw meats. To avoid cross-contamination, don’t place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat of any kind.

It’s also important to sanitize cutting boards, knives, and countertops that come into contact with raw meat by using a solution of bleach water (1 teaspoon bleach per gallon of water) or antibacterial cleaner.

Salmonella in Seattle

Sleepless-in-Seattle-sleepless-in-seattle-2974781-900-350The Seattle Times reports that as many as 16 people were likely sickened with salmonella poisoning from raw eggs used in Father’s Day weekend brunch dishes served at Tallulah’s restaurant in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, health officials said Wednesday.

Victims in the June 21 outbreak ranged in ages from 4 to 71, officials with Public Health — Seattle & King County said. There were nine confirmed cases and seven probable cases of infection, including one person who was hospitalized.

The infections were traced to crab and ham eggs Benedict dishes, which typically include a sauce made from raw eggs. Managers at the restaurant at 550 19th Ave. E reported the problem to health officials after receiving complaints from customers. Restaurant staff have been cooperative with the environmental health and epidemiologic investigation, officials said.

An investigation of the egg supplier and distributor conducted by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed no violation of regulations regarding temperature control, storage or handling, officials said. The producer reported no recent positive tests for salmonella bacteria, although they don’t routinely test raw shell eggs.

Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) Tuna Outbreak

The CDC reports that as of July 20, 2015, 62 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) have been reported from 11 states. Eleven ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.  The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Arizona (11), California (34), Illinois (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (4), Mississippi (1), New Mexico (6), South Dakota (1), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1).

This outbreak is caused by Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) bacteria, formerly known as Salmonella Java.

The illness caused by this bacteria typically includes diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12-72 hours after an exposure. Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) does not cause paratyphoid fever, enteric fever, or typhoid fever.

Epidemiologic and laboratory findings indicate that frozen raw tuna is the likely source of the infections.

Most ill people in the outbreak reported eating sushi made with raw tuna in the week before becoming sick.

On July 21, 2015, Osamu Corporation announced two voluntary recalls of frozen yellowfin tuna from one processing plant in Indonesia. The two recalls include:

All frozen tuna (loin, saku, chunk, slice, and ground market forms) sold to restaurants and grocery stores throughout the U.S. from May 9, 2014 to July 9, 2015. Affected products can be identified by four-digit purchase order numbers 8563 through 8599 located on each product carton box.

One lot of frozen yellowfin tuna chunk meat distributed to AFC Corporation for use in sushi franchises in grocery stores throughout the U.S. from May 20, 2015 to May 26, 2015. The affected lot can be identified by lot number 68568.

Restaurants and retailers should not sell or serve any of the recalled tuna products.

Carefully check your establishment’s freezers for recalled products. Return recalled products to the distributor for a refund.

When in doubt, don’t sell or serve it.

People at higher risk for serious foodborne illness should not eat any raw fish or raw shellfish, regardless of an ongoing outbreak. These groups include:

  • Children younger than 5 years
  • Adults older than 65
  • Pregnant women
  • People with weakened immune systems.

Antioch Farms and Barber Foods Linked to Salmonella Outbreaks – Again

Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to Antioch Farms brand cordon bleu stuffed chicken breast

The CDC, the Minnesota Department of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Aspen Foods.

Three people infected with a strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota. Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

The three illnesses in Minnesota occurred after people had eaten Antioch Farms brand cordon bleu stuffed chicken breast, which is produced by Aspen Foods.

On July 1, 2015, USDA-FSIS issued a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products.

On July 15, 2015, Aspen Foods issued a recall of approximately 1.9 million pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed, and breaded chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis. Products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-1358” on the packaging. Products were shipped to retail stores and food service locations nationwide.

Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Barber Foods

The CDC, several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Barber Foods.

Seven people infected with a strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota (5), Oklahoma (1), and Wisconsin (1). Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

On July 1, 2015, USDA-FSIS issued a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products.

Barber Foods issued an expanded recall of approximately 1.7 million pounds of frozen, raw stuffed chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis on July 12, 2015. This recall expanded the initial Barber Foods recall of chicken Kiev on July 2, 2015. Products were sold under many different brand names, including Barber Foods, Meijer, and Sysco. Products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-276” on the packaging. Products were shipped to retail locations nationwide and Canada. A list of recalled products is available. Photos of recalled product labels are available.

On July 13, 2015, Omaha Steaks issued a recall of stuffed chicken breast entrees that may be contaminated with Salmonella. Products were manufactured by Barber Foods and sold under the Omaha Steaks label. Products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-4230A” on the packaging. A list of recalled products is available and includes chicken cordon bleu, chicken Kiev, and chicken with broccoli and cheese.

CDC Warning: Consumers should check their freezers for recalled frozen chicken products and should not eat them. Retailers should not sell them and restaurants should not serve them.

Prior Salmonella outbreaks linked to same products

In 2014 Minnesota Public health and agriculture investigators in identified 6 cases of Salmonella Enteriditis linked to consumption of Antioch Farms brand A La Kiev raw stuffed chicken breast. Illness onsets occurred in August and September 2014. The outbreak strain was isolated in packages purchased at grocery stores.

In addition, similar products were linked to Salmonella outbreaks in 2005 S. Heidelberg2005-6 S. Enteritidis and 2006-S. Typhimurium.

267 cases of diarrheal illness associated with eating food from Tarheel Q Restaurant have been identified

(As of noon on Tuesday, July 7, 2015)

Of these 267, case distribution includes 21 North Carolina counties and 6 states.

Of the North Carolina cases 77% of cases are residents of Davidson County and Davie County.

Laboratory testing indicates that the BBQ sample and a sample from a patient who became ill during the beginning of the outbreak are both positive for Salmonella species. The serogroup was found to be Typhimurium. Both samples have the same PFGE pattern (i.e. DNA fingerprint).

Over 50 additional clinical specimens are pending results at the state lab.

  • 58% are male
  • 42% are between the ages of 20 and 49
  • 20% have visited their provider
  • 12% have visited the ED
  • 9% have been hospitalized
  • 1 death has been identified (Further details regarding the deceased are not available to protect patient confidentiality.)
  • 80% of cases had illness onset dates between Tuesday, June 16, 2015, and Sunday, June 21, 2015.

Minnesota Ties Frozen, Raw Stuffed Chicken Products to Salmonella

Screen Shot 2015-07-12 at 10.19.28 PMBarber Foods, a Portland, Maine establishment, is recalling approximately 1,707,494 pounds of frozen, raw stuffed chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The chicken products were produced between February 17, 2015 and May 20, 2015. To view a full list of products recalled as part of this expansion, please click here.

Since the original recall on July 2, 2015, two more case-patients have been identified. The scope of this recall expansion now includes all products associated with contaminated source material.

On July 2, 2015, Barber Foods recalled approximately 58,320 pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed chicken items produced on January 29, 2015; February 20, 2015; and April 23, 2015. The following product is subject to recall:

  • 2-lb. 4-oz. cardboard box containing 6 individually pouched pieces of “BARBER FOODS PREMIUM ENTREES BREADED-BONELESS RAW STUFFED CHICKEN BREASTS WITH RIB MEAT KIEV” with use by/sell by date of April 28, 2016, May 20, 2016 and July 21, 2016 and Lot Code number 0950292102, 0950512101, or 0951132202.

The products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-276” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These products were shipped to retail locations nationwide and Canada.

FSIS was notified of a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis illnesses on June 24, 2015. Working in conjunction with Minnesota State Departments of Health and Agriculture, Wisconsin Department of Health Services, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, FSIS determined that there is a link between the frozen, raw, stuffed chicken products from Barber Foods and this illness cluster. Based on epidemiological evidence and traceback investigations, six case-patients have been identified in Minnesota and Wisconsin with illness onset dates ranging from April 5, 2015 to June 23, 2015 that link to the specific Barber Foods products. FSIS continues to work with public health partners on this investigation.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after exposure to the organism. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some products may be in consumers’ freezers. Although the products subject to recall may appear to be cooked, these products are in fact uncooked (raw) and should be handled carefully to avoid cross-contamination in the kitchen. Particular attention needs to be paid to safely prepare and cook these raw poultry products to a temperature of 165° F checking at the center, the thickest part and the surface of the product.

Cashews Recalled

Maya Overseas Foods Inc. of Maspeth, NY, is recalling approximately 8000 lbs. of Cashew Split because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The Cashew Split was distributed between February 18, 2015 and March 20, 2015 to retailers and restaurants located in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Florida by direct trucking and delivery.

Maya brand Cashew Split was sold uncoded in 7 oz. (UPC 020843230389), 14 oz. (UPC 020843230716), 28 oz. (UPC 020843230327) and 5 lbs. (UPC 020843230303) clear plastic pouches. The Cashew Split was also sold in bulk 50 lbs. tins.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was as the result of routine FDA sampling at our supplier which revealed that the bulk Cashew Split contained the bacteria. The company has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and the supplier continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

Raw, Frozen, Breaded and Pre-browned Stuffed Chicken Entrees Linked to Salmonella

The Minnesota Department of Health and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, along with CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), are investigating two outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned stuffed chicken entrees.

In one outbreak, four people infected with a strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota. Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

In the second outbreak, three people infected with a different strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota. Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

On July 1, 2015, USDA-FSIS issued a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products.

USDA-FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare and cook these products. Read more on the Advice to Consumers page.

As a result of the first investigation, on July 2, 2015, Barber Foods recalled approximately 58,320 pounds of Chicken Kiev because it may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis.

The product subject to recall includes a 2 lb.-4 oz. box containing six individually pouched pieces of “Barber Foods Premium Entrees Breaded-Boneless Raw Stuffed Chicken Breasts with Rib Meat Kiev” with use by/sell by dates of April 28, 2016, May 20, 2016, and July 21, 2016.

In 2014 Minnesota Public health and agriculture investigators in identified 6 cases of Salmonella Enteriditis linked to consumption of Antioch Farms brand A La Kiev raw stuffed chicken breast. Illness onsets occurred in August and September 2014. The outbreak strain was isolated in packages purchased at grocery stores.

In addition, similar products were linked to Salmonella outbreaks in 2005 S. Heidelberg2005-6 S. Enteritidis and 2006-S. Typhimurium.

Antioch Farms Brand A La Kiev Tied Again To Salmonella

In 2014 Minnesota Public health and agriculture investigators in identified 6 cases of Salmonella Enteriditis linked to consumption of Antioch Farms brand A La Kiev raw stuffed chicken breast. Illness onsets occurred in August and September 2014. The outbreak strain was isolated in packages purchased at grocery stores.

Minnesota state health and agriculture officials said today that seven recent cases of salmonellosis in Minnesota have been linked to raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken entrees. Investigators from the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) determined that the illnesses occurred in two separate outbreaks, involving two different strains of Salmonella bacteria in products from two distinct, unrelated producers.

In the first outbreak, four illnesses occurring from April 5 through June 8 were linked to Barber Foods Chicken Kiev. This product has a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) stamped code of P-276. This product is sold at many different retailers, including grocery store chains. The four cases in this outbreak ranged in age from 19 to 82 years, all from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

In the second outbreak, three people got sick from May 9 to June 8 after eating Antioch Farms brand Cordon Bleu raw stuffed chicken breast with a U.S. Department of Agriculture stamped code of P-1358. This product is sold at many different grocery store chains. The three cases were all adults in their 30s and 40s from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

No deaths have been linked to either outbreak. MDH and MDA are working with USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) on the investigation. The investigation is on-going.

With these two outbreaks, there have now been nine outbreaks of salmonellosis in Minnesota linked to these types of products since 1998.

Idaho 290, North Carolina 248 in Salmonella Outbreak Race

Idaho:  The Central District Health Department (CDHD) is investigating a Salmonella outbreak associated with the Boise Co-op deli – specifically food purchased from the deli after June 1, 2015.

As of July 1, 2015, approximately 290 cases of Salmonella are associated with this outbreak. Preliminary test results showed Salmonella growth in raw turkey, tomatoes and onion. However, additional laboratory tests are pending and the specific cause of the outbreak remains undetermined.

Salmonella is a bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria.

Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States.

North Carolina:  According to the North Carolina Department of Health, 248 cases of diarrheal illness associated with Salmonella and eating food from Tarheel Q Restaurant have been identified.

Of these 248, case distribution includes 19 North Carolina counties and 5 states. Of the North Carolina cases 72% of cases are residents of Davidson County and Davie County.

Laboratory testing indicates that the BBQ sample and a sample from a patient who became ill during the beginning of the outbreak are both positive for Salmonella species. The serogroup was found to be Typhimurium. Both samples have the same PFGE pattern (i.e. DNA fingerprint). Over 50 additional clinical specimens are pending results at the state lab.

Of these 248 cases:

55% are male

41% are between the ages of 20 and 49

20% have visited their provider

13% have visited the ED

6% have been hospitalized

1 death has been identified (Further details regarding the deceased are not available to protect patient confidentiality.)

79% of cases had illness onset dates between Tuesday, June 16, 2015, and Sunday, June 21, 2015.